Acquisitions & Hotel Openings

Shangri-La Hotel, Putian Breaks Ground in Fujian China with Opening Planned Q4 2020

PUTIAN, CN. July 17, 2017 – Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts announced the development of a new urban resort in Fujian Province at a groundbreaking ceremony in the Chengxiang District of Putian. Scheduled to open in the fourth quarter of 2020, Shangri-La Hotel, Putian will be the group’s third property in Fujian Province, following Shangri-La hotels in Fuzhou, which opened in April 2005, and Xiamen, which is scheduled open in 2017.

Renowned for being the origin of Mazu, the Goddess of the Sea in Chinese culture, Putian is a well-known cultural city with a history of more than 1,400 years. It has distinctive advantages of coastal scenery and cultural tourism resources. In recent years, Putian has successfully diversified its economy. As an important manufacturing center on China’s Southeast Coast, the city is being transformed and upgraded, resulting in a new level of innovation and growth. Real estate and tourism developments are flourishing, while cultural and creative industries are being explored as new directions.

Dedicated to bringing a new international, luxurious hospitality experience to the city, Shangri-La Hotel, Putian will have 247 well-appointed guest rooms offering panoramic views of the city and Yanshou river. The hotel will include a lobby lounge, restaurants, spa, fitness center, swimming pool and a 1,200-square-meter (about 12,917-square-foot) ballroom. Next to the hotel will be a lively mix of restaurants, bars and retail shops set in a 3,500-square-meter (about 37,674-square-foot) village-style plaza. The hotel is conveniently located within a 20-minute drive from the train station.

Uniquely positioned at the juncture of history and modernity, Shangri-La Hotel, Putian will pay tribute to the river town’s ancient heritage as well as harmony between man and nature. The hotel overlooks Yanshou River southward and the landmark Shouxi Park, which is one of the largest ecological city parks in Fujian Province. The hotel is also adjacent to the renowned Yanshou Village, where the millennium-old Yanshou Bridge, a 900-year-old lychee tree (“The Champion Red”) and a collection of antique temples and ancestral halls are found. The entire area will be protected and developed into a culture village by the local government to create a destination for leisure, recreation, culture and tourism.

“Putian has remarkable economic potential for both business and tourism, which presents a great opportunity for the group,” said Mr. LIM Beng Chee, chief executive officer of Shangri-La Asia. “The design and construction of Shangri-La Hotel, Putian will reflect a distinctive blend of nature and culture. We look forward to creating a unique dining and stay experience for guests and local residents, and to bringing a dynamic lifestyle experience to the city.”

About Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts

Hong Kong-based Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts, one of the world’s premier hotel management companies, currently operates over 95 hotels in 22 countries and 73 destinations under the Shangri-La, Kerry, Hotel Jen and Traders brands. Prominently positioned in Asia, the group has established its brand hallmark of “hospitality from the heart” over four decades in Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Europe, North America and the Indian Ocean. The group has a substantial development pipeline with upcoming projects in Australia, mainland China, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Saudi Arabia and Sri Lanka. For more information, please visit www.shangri-la.com.

Contact:
Judy Reeves
judy.reeves@shangri-la.com
(212) 382-3155

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key
The challenge for hotel food and beverage operations is to serve the personal tastes and needs of an increasingly diverse population and, at the same time, to keep up with ever-evolving industry trends. In order to accomplish this, restaurateurs and hoteliers have to flex their creative muscles and pull out all the stops to satisfy their various audiences. One way to achieve this is to utilize existing food spaces in multiple ways at different times of the day. Lunch can be casual and fast, while dinnertime can be more formal and slower paced. The same restaurant can offer counter service by day but provide table service by night, with a completely different menu and atmosphere. Changes in music, lighting, uniforms and tabletop design contribute to its transformation. This multi- purpose approach seeks to meet the dining needs of guests as they change throughout the day. Today’s restaurants also have to go to great lengths to fulfill all the diverse dietary preferences of their guests. The popularity of plant-based, paleo, vegan, and gluten and allergen-free diets means that traditional menus must evolve from protein-heavy, carb-loaded offerings to those featuring more vegetables and legumes. Chefs are doing creative things with vegetables, such as experimenting with global cuisines or incorporating new vegetable hybrids into their dishes. Another trend is an emphasis on bold and creative flavors. From chili oil to sriracha to spicy maple syrup, entrees, desserts and beverages are all being enhanced with spice and heat. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.