Hotel Business Review: Week of Aug 29, 2016

Michael Coughlin
  • Technology
  • Using Paid Search Engines to Maximize Returns
  • Since its infancy in the late 90s and early 2000s, paid search has been a highly effective tactic for capturing would-be travelers that are actively exploring travel options. There’s seemingly no better way to attain a new hotel guest than by delivering an ad promoting your hotel when someone is searching for “hotels” in your market area. For instance, if you are promoting hotel rooms in Las Vegas, you would likely deliver relevant ads to people searching for keywords such as “Las Vegas hotel,” “Las Vegas hotels,” and “Vegas hotel reviews. ”According to Prognosis Digital, 79% of people that book hotels online search for that particular hotel on a search engine before buying. Thus, having a presence on search engines is essential for any hotel. Read on...

Matt Lindsay
  • Revenue Management
  • The Value of Customer-Lifetime Value in the Hospitality Industry
  • As simple as it sounds, knowing which customers are profitable is a challenging task for many businesses. Predicting which customers have the most profit potential is even more challenging since it requires estimation of future business. Applying these same modeling techniques and profit calculations to potential customers adds yet another degree of difficulty. Customer lifetime value (CLV) is a (relatively) old concept. Businesses have been calculating the expected operating margins received from a customer from long before the birth of the internet and modern data tools. Read on...

Ravneet Bhandari
  • Revenue Management
  • Outside-In Vs Inside-Out Hotel Demand Forecasting
  • Rate optimization is arguably the most critical component of a successful Revenue Management strategy, but most hoteliers still tend to fall into two broad categories when it comes to this discipline: Set-it-and-forget-it, or follow-the-market. Both of these approaches are sub-optimal as they simply ignore the evolving purchasing patterns of increasingly savvy customers. We live in an era of disintermediated distribution, and the reality is that meta search and third party aggregators have made it easier than ever for customers to shop and compare options. Read on...

Scott Acton
  • Development & Construction
  • The Benefits of Prefabricated Construction in High-Tourism Areas
  • In the hospitality and tourism industries, guests’ happiness reigns supreme. With ever-changing consumer demands and evolving technologies, new developments and renovations alike often cause disruptions to the normal function of businesses, impairing the public’s accessibility to the venue, or adjacent venues. Hence, construction timelines become a crucial issue with projects situated in high-density tourism areas. Improved time-efficiency minimizes the disturbances in local businesses’ operation and profitability. Yet, shorter timelines might come at a price of higher expenses on labor, machinery and materials. Read on...

AUGUST: Food & Beverage: Going Casual

Jim Stormont

In the restaurant industry, good isn’t good enough. People no longer seek out the best ingredients, menus and experiences; they expect them. There’s a reason why Panera Bread has vowed to remove artificial ingredients from its food by the end of the year, and it’s no surprise that Darden Restaurants – which owns Olive Garden, LongHorn Steakhouse and, until recently, Red Lobster – is floundering. People are asking: “Why overpay for a mass-produced pasta dinner with processed meats and cheeses that’s also available at over 800 identical restaurants around the country?” The so-called “foodie revolution” is in full swing, with burger lovers choosing Shake Shack over Big Macs Read on...

Larry Steinberg

Food and beverage sales represent a huge source of revenue for full-service resorts and hotels. As a result, many properties spend a great deal of time and money refining food preparation techniques, menu selection, and even restaurant decor. Yet, these same hotels often ignore the area that can have the biggest bottom-line impact on F&B delivery — technology. Today’s best-in-class F&B software systems address every aspect of operations — from online reservations and mobile ordering, to point-of-sale and payment. So, whether you’re a small boutique hotel or a large resort property, consider these five technology solutions when planning your restaurant upgrades. Read on...

Ron Pohl

It’s no secret that one of the most important aspects of any hospitality company is how it develops and manages its food and beverage program. Oftentimes, a business or leisure traveler will make his or her decision on the next vacation or property based on the offerings in this category. At Best Western® Hotels & Resorts, we have an understanding of just how important it is for us to differentiate our product from our competitors and constantly rethink and reinvent our offerings to exceed consumer expectations. Through guest feedback, research and analysis, we’ve uncovered that a quality breakfast is a significant driver of guest satisfaction in both the business and leisure travel segments. Read on...

Brian Bullock

In today’s environment, hotel owners and operators must find or create a food and beverage (F&B) concept that is accessible, inviting and relevant to the market. It’s important to create an atmosphere that entices hotel guests out of their rooms and into the greater scene, as having an alluring, busy restaurant enhances the hotel guest experience. However, to create a sustainable and profitable F&B offering, the hotel must attract local customers as well. To achieve this, the menu must be crafted around an unfulfilled need in the market and deliver on the service promise of the hotel brand. Read on...

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review


Feature Focus
Hotel Group Meetings: Demand is Trending Up
Corporations and businesses are once again renewing their investments in people, strategic planning, and training and development. As a result, all indicators point to 2016 being a robust year for the hotel group meetings business. Group demand is strong and rates, especially during peak periods, are trending up. Still, hotels must continue to evolve to meet the changing expectations of group meeting planners and their clients. There are several trends and factors that are driving decision-making which planners have identified as being essential to the process. Though geographic location and room rates continue to be the most important factors when selecting a host property, food and beverage choices are becoming increasingly influential. Planners understand the value of first-class culinary options as these are often used to facilitate networking experiences. Another critical factor is the availability of sufficient bandwidth for high-speed wired and wireless connectivity to the internet. In addition, in an effort to eliminate unsightly and unwieldy power cords, planners are requesting the installation of mobile-device charging stations. These portable charging stations (which do not require devices to be plugged in) can be conveniently placed in common areas or directly in meeting rooms. Finally, there is a greater emphasis on teambuilding activities that are intended to challenge groups, and bring them closer together. Some hotels are offering scenic walking trails, GPS-aided scavenger hunts, kayaking into secluded coves or rollerblading on oceanfront boardwalks, among many other recreational activities. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group business and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.