{HBR_LEAD_468x60.media}

Business & Finance

17 Legendary Historic Hotels Inducted into Historic Hotels of America and Historic Hotel Worldwide

WASHINGTON, D.C. May 11, 2017 - Historic Hotels of America® and Historic Hotels Worldwide® have inducted 17 historic hotels into membership through April 2017. These historic hotels date back to the 13th century. The 17 iconic hotels represent different independent hotels, brands, and collections from around the world and from 10 countries.

Historic Hotels of America has inducted these hotels through April 2017:

•Inn at Willow Grove (1778) Orange, Virginia

Hotel fun fact: During the Revolutionary War Generals Wayne (Georgia) and Muhlenberg (Pennsylvania) camped at Willow Grove during the southern campaign to assist Marquis de Lafayette in forcing the British to surrender. Inn at Willow Grove was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 and the Virginia Landmarks Register in 1978.

•Penn Wells Hotel (1869) Wellsboro, Pennsylvania

Hotel fun fact: The Philadelphia Inquirer called it “the gem of the Roosevelt Highway.” During World War II, Corning Glass Works, the predecessor to today’s Corning Inc. celebrated its Christmas party at the hotel, and in appreciation, presented the iconic American flag made of 1,438 Christmas ornaments which can be seen today in the lobby.

•Hotel Saranac, Curio Collection by Hilton (1927) Saranac Lake, New York

Hotel fun fact: An iconic landmark in the Saranac Lake village, the hotel has been thoughtfully restored and renovated while maintaining its historic charm and fascinating architecture, including the Great Hall, inspired by a 14th century Italian palace.

•Alpenhof Lodge (1965) Teton Village, Wyoming

Hotel fun fact: The Alpenhof Lodge, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2016. Alpenhof, the first lodge built in Teton Village, preserves its Bavarian-heritage style similar to those in many Alpine ski resort destinations.

Historic Hotels Worldwide has inducted these hotels through April 2017:

•NH Collection Florence Porta Rossa (13th Century) Florence, Italy

Hotel fun fact: The windows of the hotel bear an inscription in Italian, Per non dormire "[A reward] For not sleeping,” the motto of the Salimbeni family, the first owners of the ancient palace. This hotel is thought to be among the oldest in Italy.

•Old Course Hotel, Golf Resort & Spa (1400) St. Andrews, Scotland

Hotel fun fact: The Old Course at St. Andrews is one of the oldest golf courses in the world. Golf became popular in the Middle Ages, so much so that the game was banned in 1457 by King James II of Scotland, who felt it was distracting young men from archery practice. Succeeding monarchs repeated this ban until James IV became a golfer himself.

•NH Collection Amsterdam Barbizon Palace (15th Century) Amsterdam, Netherlands

Hotel fun fact: Located across from Amsterdam Central Station, the heart of the hotel is built from several 17th century Dutch townhouses that have been seamlessly combined. The hotel’s predominant meeting space is the 15th century St. Olaf Chapel. The chapel, named for the Norwegian monarch from 1015 to 1028, is believed to be one of the oldest standing structures in Amsterdam and is accessible through an underground passageway.

•Domus Renier Boutique Hotel (1608) Chania, Crete, Greece

Hotel fun fact: For centuries, Chania Harbor served as the first defense against invading armies from the Roman Empire, the Byzantine peninsula, and the Ottoman Empire. The entire Chania area, including its classic architecture, spectacular towers, awe inspiring gates, tranquil monasteries, opulent palaces, clandestine underground exits and entrances, and historic fortifications, is pending approval and designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The hotel complex that houses the palazzo, constructed in the beginning of the 15th century, is also home to a small family chapel, the Panagia of Renier, which is located on the back side of the mansion itself. This chapel, as well as the gate to the palace, have remained untouched. They have been preserved and are in magnificent condition.

•Hotel Taschenbergpalais Kempinski Dresden (18th Century) Dresden, Germany

Hotel fun fact: Taschenbergpalais had a prominent role in the history of the Saxony region and the city of Dresden. Originally built by a celebrated patron of architecture, and King of Poland, Augustus II the Strong, the palace became the home for generations of Crown Princes and their families. Following an incredible restoration that began in 1992, the palace was transformed back into a luxurious celebration of its royal past and opened as a luxury hotel.

•NH Collection Madrid Palacio de Tepa (1808) Madrid, Spain

Hotel fun fact: Located in Barrio de las Letras, Madrid’s literary district, and first built for the last Viceroy of Spain in Mexico, the hotel is a former, neoclassical palace. Genuine 16th century artifacts are displayed behind glass panels at the reception desk. The hotel sits in front of the Church of San Sebastian, built in 1554.

•NH Collection Amsterdam Doelen (1815) Amsterdam, Netherlands

Hotel fun fact: Overlooking the beautiful Amstel River and dating from the 15th century, the original building, The Swych Utrecht tower, was built in 1481 as part of the complete defense wall that protected the city. The tower was used as a military training space, or a “doelen,” for the Kloveniers, who were civic militia guards. In 1642, the civic guards assigned Rembrandt van Rijn to produce a group portrait of their militia company. This painting was later called The Night Watch and became one of the most famous paintings in the world. By the 17th century, the tower had been expanded into the City Hall, and in 1815, it was transformed into a hotel. The hotel’s Rembrandt Suite is along the wall where The Night Watch was first displayed.

•NH Collection Venice Palazzo Barocci (1890) Venice, Italy

Hotel fun fact: The hotel is located in a former Venetian palace, overlooking the Grand Canal and the Rialto Bridge, and built on the site of the former Teatro San Angelo (1676). Renowned composer Vivaldi premiered many of his famous operas in this theater. Today, the images that line the walls of the hotel are all historic Venice from the Alinari collection; Fratelli Alinari being the world’s oldest photography studio dating back to 1852.

•Grand Hotel Kempinski High Tatras (1894) Strba Strbske Pleso, Slovakia

Hotel fun fact: Grand Hotel Kempinski High Tatras consists of three parts, all of which were established in different periods. The oldest is the Jánošík, which was completed in 1894, followed by the Kriváò, which was completed in 1906, and finally the Hviezdoslav, completed in 1923. All of these buildings were eventually linked together to form one hotel complex.

•NH Collection Roma Palazzo Cinquecento (1900s) Rome, Italy

Hotel fun fact: Originally built as a post office in the early 1900s this historic hotel overlooks an idyllic garden. In front of this garden is a section of the Servian Wall, which was constructed to protect “The Eternal City” in the 4th century BC.

•Hotel Adlon Kempinski (1907) Berlin, Germany

Hotel fun fact: Hotel Adlon Kempinski is one of the most legendary hotels in Germany. The list of famous guests that stayed at the original Hotel Adlon is a virtual “who’s who” of celebrities and entertainers. Albert Einstein could often be seen in the window of his corner suite, which overlooked the Brandenburg Gate, waving to pedestrians on the Pariser Platz below. Suite 101-114 was the preferred room of Charlie Chaplin. Other famous guests include industrialists Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, Presidents Herbert Hoover, Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt; and Hollywood luminaries Mary Pickford and Josephine Baker. The second Hotel Adlon re-opened on August 23, 1997 and celebrates over 100 years of history.

•NH Collection Brussels Centre (1926) Brussels, Belgium

Hotel fun fact: This Art Deco hotel near the Rue Neuve, was built for visitors to the 1930 World Exposition. In honor of its centennial, Belgium welcomed guests from around the world to two massive fairs in Liege and Antwerp. The hotel was designed by Michel Polak (1885-1948), a famous Belgian architect recognized for his art deco, classicism, and modernism architectural styles. He is credited with numerous projects within Europe including the renovation of the personal Villa for Henri Nestlé, founder of the Nestlé Company, in Montreux, Switzerland.

•Tivoli Lisboa (1933) Lisbon, Portugal

Hotel fun fact: The Tivoli Lisboa is just a short walk from traditional Portuguese neighborhoods such as the Bairro Alto and Chiado. The hotel’s name is from the landmark music hall/cinema (Teatro Tivoli) that still occupies the western corner of the Avenida da Liberdade. Beatriz Costa was the biggest star of musical theatre in Portugal and Brazil. She lived the last 30 years of her life in room number 600 and is the “soul” of the hotel.

“We are delighted to have inducted these four legendary historic hotels into Historic Hotels of America and these 13 iconic historic hotels into Historic Hotels Worldwide through April 2017,” said Lawrence Horwitz, Executive Director, Historic Hotels of America and Historic Hotels Worldwide. “We are very pleased to announce new partnerships with NH Collection Hotels and with Kempinski Hotels and look forward to inducting additional historic hotels in 2017 from each of these companies. We commend these companies for their tremendous stewardship of their historic hotels. Based on nominations currently in review, we expect to announce later this year the induction of many more independent historic hotels as well as historic hotels representing many brands and collections into both historic programs.”

About Historic Hotels of America

Historic Hotels of America is the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation for recognizing and celebrating the finest Historic Hotels. Historic Hotels of America has more than 298 historic hotels that have all faithfully maintained their authenticity, sense of place, and architectural integrity in the United States of America, including 46 states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. Historic Hotels of America is comprised of mostly independently owned and operated properties. More than 30 of the world’s finest hospitality brands, chains, and collections are represented in Historic Hotels of America. To be nominated and selected for membership into this prestigious program, a hotel must be at least 50 years old; has been designated by the U.S. Secretary of the Interior as a National Historic Landmark or listed in or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places; and recognized as having historic significance. To learn more, please visit HistoricHotels.org To nominate a favorite historic hotel for membership, HistoricHotels.org/Nominate.

About Historic Hotels Worldwide

Washington, DC based Historic Hotels Worldwide® is a prestigious collection of more than 260 historic treasures, including historic hotels, castles, chateaus, palaces, academies, haciendas, villas, monasteries, and other historic lodging spanning more than ten centuries. Historic Hotels Worldwide recognizes authentic cultural treasures that demonstrate exemplary historic preservation and their inspired architecture, cultural traditions, and authentic cuisine. To be nominated and selected, historical lodging properties must be at least 75 years old; utilize historic accommodations; serve as the former home or be located on the grounds of the former home of famous persons or significant location for an event in history; be located in or within walking distance to a historic district, historically significant landmark, place of historic event, or a historic city center; be recognized by a local preservation organization or national trust; and display historic memorabilia, artwork, photography, and other examples of its historic significance. To be selected in the United States for inclusion in Historic Hotels Worldwide, a hotel must meet the above criteria plus be a member of Historic Hotels of America. For more information, please visit HistoricHotelsWorldwide.com. To nominate a favorite historic hotel for membership, HistoricHotelsWorldwide.com/Nominate.

Contact:
Heather Taylor
htaylor@historichotels.org
+1 202 772 8333

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.