Appointments & Promotions

Midas Hospitality Names Jim Brueggemann as New CFO

Brueggemann previously served as company's Vice President of Finance

MARYLAND HEIGHTS, MO. January 11, 2017 - Midas Hospitality, a premier hotel management group, recently appointed Jim Brueggemann, CPA, as the company’s new Chief Financial Officer.

Brueggemann will manage the company’s central accounting office in order to deliver accurate and timely financial analysis. He will be accountable for the development of economic strategies and preparation of corporate growth plans. Brueggemann also will oversee both financial forecasting efforts and risk management operations.

Prior to his new position, Brueggemann was the company’s Vice President of Finance. He joined Midas Hospitality in May, 2013 with more than 18 years of accounting and finance experience. The majority of his career has been in real estate construction and development, as well as property management. Brueggemann graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a BSBA in Accounting.

“Jim is an excellent choice for Chief Financial Officer, and we are pleased to promote him to this very integral position within our organization,” said David Robert, Midas Hospitality’s Managing Member and CEO. “We look forward to achieving even greater success in the upcoming years thanks to his experience and industry knowledge.”

Founded in 2006, Midas Hospitality has developed, opened and currently manages numerous properties including 30 hotels in 11 states. The company serves global brands including Hilton, IHG, Marriott, and Starwood. Midas Hospitality’s headquarters are located at 1804 Borman Circle Dr. in Maryland Heights, Mo. For more information, call (314) 692-0100 or visit http://www.midashospitality.com.

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.