Cultural Tourism
John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • The Architectural Attraction: How Great Architecture Attracts Tourism
  • Within the past decade, many of the nation's leading museums and concert halls have hired starchitects the likes of Gehry, Calatrava, Libeskind, and Taniguchi to create singularly stunning structures that, like massive titanium magnets, attract visitors to them. So, too, hoteliers are renovating landmark buildings in major cities into new use as signature hotels. Branded destinations are exporting their architectural concepts abroad. Read on...

Andrew Freeman
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Cultural Diversity - A World of Opportunity
  • Diversity is no longer a lofty idea for the future and wishful thinking. Nor is it something regional affecting select sections of the country. From vendors to guests, staff to neighbors, diversity is here, it is now, it is universal. Revisiting existing strategies and tactics and implementing new ones to accommodate true diversity and inclusion in your hotel is not only socially responsible, it is just good business. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Partnerships in Preservation: Sustainable Heritage Tourism
  • Tourism has become recognized as essential to sustaining historic preservation and California's tourism industry is responding to that reality. Responding to encouragement by President George W. Bush's historic preservation advisor, John Nau, III, Californians organized a California Cultural Heritage Tourism Council in 2004 which subsequently has sponsored symposia and efforts to connect tourism with cultural and heritage preservation. "We recognized that California's vast geography and diverse heritage and cultures kept tourism, cultural and heritage leaders from speaking to one another and thus cooperating. By coming together, we have been able to generate highly visible promotional efforts and stimulate cooperation, to the benefit of preservation," says Susan Wilcox, co-chair of the California Cultural Heritage Tourism Council and Deputy Director of the California Travel and Tourism Commission. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • China, from Exclusion to Inclusion
  • In response to increasing financial and cultural ties between China and the United States, both countries have eased travel restrictions. The China National Tourism Administration (CNTA) and U.S. Department of Commerce recently announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which is intended to boost travel between the two countries and serve to "strengthen relations and forge new friendships." The MOU opens China's growing market to U.S. travel and tourism industries with a push toward expanding group leisure travel from China to the U.S. CNTA Chairman Shao Qiwei sees it as broadening exchange and cooperation between the countries in economic, cultural and air service areas. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Cultural Event Marketing: How hotels are profiting from cultural events
  • Cultural events have long been touted by arts organizations as benefiting hotels. Research studies by the Los Angeles County-based organizations prove the claim. In the late 1990s and again in the early 2000s, the effectiveness of major art exhibits to attract visitors to Los Angeles County were studied by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and by The Museum of Contemporary Art as driven by LA's Cultural Tourism Department. Those studies documented not just the economic and social impact of major Vincent Van Gogh and Andy Warhol exhibitions, but proved once and for all time that strong exhibits - effectively promoted - attract out-of-town visitors, sell rooms and can be extremely lucrative to hotels. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Heritage Corridors: Routes to Increased Occupancy
  • When limited markets are divided among competing hotels with similar facilities and services, hoteliers find that new guests can be attracted and hotel occupancy increased by revisiting the past. They've discovered that heritage corridors create additional reasons to travel a route, be loyal to a property and stay longer. These less-traveled corridors were once the beaten path, but now have nostalgic appeal for travelers in search of a slower pace, authenticity and our nation's history. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • The Cultural Heritage Tourist
  • According to The Historic/Cultural Traveler, a weathered, but oft-quoted 2003 study by the Travel Industry Association of America and Smithsonian Magazine, more than half of U.S. adults (over 118 million people) include at least one art, history, humanities or heritage activity or event when they travel. You find them swaying to exotic music at cultural events, festivals and fairs. They're drawn to ethnic neighborhoods for authentic foods and imports. Clusters of them are seen looking skyward as they walk through historic districts on guided architectural tours. Others are involved in volunteer projects to both immerse themselves in a destination while helping to preserve it. They walk battlefields, often as knowledgeable about what took place as are local guides. The travel stories they retell are of the cultural treasures they saw and the remarkable local people they met. Read on...

FEBRUARY: Social Media: Interacting with the Hotel Customer

Eugenio Pirri

In the service sector, people are the lynchpin of any business, and success or failure hinges upon them. Though this success can only be unlocked if employees are spotted, nurtured, engaged and developed; the key to which is great hotel leadership. In this exclusive article for Hotel Executive, Vice President for People and Organisational Development at luxury management company, Dorchester Collection, and author of Be A People Leader, Eugenio Pirri, explores what it takes to be a people leader in the 21st Century and why businesses across the world are currently experiencing a leadership deficit. Read on...

Marigrace McKay

Human Resource leaders in all business sectors are stumped by how to hire the talented employees needed by their businesses in order to meet company strategic objectives. This responsibility is especially difficult in the service sector of hospitality. In no other sector is the one-to-one personal connection more important, perhaps with the exception of medical providers. In hospitality, an employees’ air, attitude, a wrong word or gesture can be perceived badly by the customer – a kiss of death. Or, with another customer the same circumstances can be received with over the top joy, acclaim, compliments, and kudos – a big win! Read on...

Peter McAlpine

There is increasing awareness in the hotel industry that something intangible is missing in hospitality because generally speaking it is not making the sought-after emotional and energetic connection to the guest’s heart, which will increase revenue and make guests flock to the brand. Hospitality still feels energetically and emotionally weak in spite of all efforts to change this, and I would like to shed some light on why this is so. In short, the hotel industry would make the connection and revolutionise hospitality by changing from the mechanistic Newtonian worldview to the energetic Quantum worldview, which replaced it in 1925. Read on...

Roberta Chinsky Matuson

The U.S. labor market continues to tighten with The Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting a decline in the unemployment rate to 4.6 percent in November of 2016. The unemployment rate is even lower in many states and metropolitan areas. Unrealistic expectations and increased stress, due to staffing shortages, is causing many employees to reconsider their current work situations. Many will soon choose to depart. This will only add to the need for organizations to involve more than HR, if they are to fill job openings promptly or at all. Read on...

Coming Up In The March Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Human Resources: Inspiring a Journey of Success
In an increasingly competitive environment where hotels are competing to attract, and more importantly, to keep top talent, Human Resource managers are realizing the need to focus on improving their Employee Experience. Smart managers are embracing the idea of Employee Wellness which translates into a system of physical, mental, emotional, and purposeful well-being. Some organizations are even providing free counseling for their employees and their dependents. The goal is to nurture, support and engage with their employees in a way that increases productivity, improves customer service, enhances loyalty, and creates a more harmonious work environment for all. Along with this development is the need for more effective, ongoing training. Many HR managers rely on external training firms for this, but there is a growing trend which taps the experience and expertise that already exists within the organization. For example, younger employees likely have greater knowledge of social media which an older generation might struggle with. Harnessing this peer-to-peer learning can be an efficient and cost effective way of increasing skills, and as a result, the knowledge transferred is likely to be more acceptable and relevant. Finally, HR managers need to foster an environment that empowers people and taps into their full potential, inspiring a personal journey of success. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the strategies and techniques that human resource directors are currently developing in order to achieve success.