Cultural Tourism
John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • The Architectural Attraction: How Great Architecture Attracts Tourism
  • Within the past decade, many of the nation's leading museums and concert halls have hired starchitects the likes of Gehry, Calatrava, Libeskind, and Taniguchi to create singularly stunning structures that, like massive titanium magnets, attract visitors to them. So, too, hoteliers are renovating landmark buildings in major cities into new use as signature hotels. Branded destinations are exporting their architectural concepts abroad. Read on...

Andrew Freeman
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Cultural Diversity - A World of Opportunity
  • Diversity is no longer a lofty idea for the future and wishful thinking. Nor is it something regional affecting select sections of the country. From vendors to guests, staff to neighbors, diversity is here, it is now, it is universal. Revisiting existing strategies and tactics and implementing new ones to accommodate true diversity and inclusion in your hotel is not only socially responsible, it is just good business. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Partnerships in Preservation: Sustainable Heritage Tourism
  • Tourism has become recognized as essential to sustaining historic preservation and California's tourism industry is responding to that reality. Responding to encouragement by President George W. Bush's historic preservation advisor, John Nau, III, Californians organized a California Cultural Heritage Tourism Council in 2004 which subsequently has sponsored symposia and efforts to connect tourism with cultural and heritage preservation. "We recognized that California's vast geography and diverse heritage and cultures kept tourism, cultural and heritage leaders from speaking to one another and thus cooperating. By coming together, we have been able to generate highly visible promotional efforts and stimulate cooperation, to the benefit of preservation," says Susan Wilcox, co-chair of the California Cultural Heritage Tourism Council and Deputy Director of the California Travel and Tourism Commission. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • China, from Exclusion to Inclusion
  • In response to increasing financial and cultural ties between China and the United States, both countries have eased travel restrictions. The China National Tourism Administration (CNTA) and U.S. Department of Commerce recently announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which is intended to boost travel between the two countries and serve to "strengthen relations and forge new friendships." The MOU opens China's growing market to U.S. travel and tourism industries with a push toward expanding group leisure travel from China to the U.S. CNTA Chairman Shao Qiwei sees it as broadening exchange and cooperation between the countries in economic, cultural and air service areas. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Cultural Event Marketing: How hotels are profiting from cultural events
  • Cultural events have long been touted by arts organizations as benefiting hotels. Research studies by the Los Angeles County-based organizations prove the claim. In the late 1990s and again in the early 2000s, the effectiveness of major art exhibits to attract visitors to Los Angeles County were studied by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and by The Museum of Contemporary Art as driven by LA's Cultural Tourism Department. Those studies documented not just the economic and social impact of major Vincent Van Gogh and Andy Warhol exhibitions, but proved once and for all time that strong exhibits - effectively promoted - attract out-of-town visitors, sell rooms and can be extremely lucrative to hotels. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Heritage Corridors: Routes to Increased Occupancy
  • When limited markets are divided among competing hotels with similar facilities and services, hoteliers find that new guests can be attracted and hotel occupancy increased by revisiting the past. They've discovered that heritage corridors create additional reasons to travel a route, be loyal to a property and stay longer. These less-traveled corridors were once the beaten path, but now have nostalgic appeal for travelers in search of a slower pace, authenticity and our nation's history. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • The Cultural Heritage Tourist
  • According to The Historic/Cultural Traveler, a weathered, but oft-quoted 2003 study by the Travel Industry Association of America and Smithsonian Magazine, more than half of U.S. adults (over 118 million people) include at least one art, history, humanities or heritage activity or event when they travel. You find them swaying to exotic music at cultural events, festivals and fairs. They're drawn to ethnic neighborhoods for authentic foods and imports. Clusters of them are seen looking skyward as they walk through historic districts on guided architectural tours. Others are involved in volunteer projects to both immerse themselves in a destination while helping to preserve it. They walk battlefields, often as knowledgeable about what took place as are local guides. The travel stories they retell are of the cultural treasures they saw and the remarkable local people they met. Read on...

MAY: Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability

Eric Ricaurte

In 2011, we visited the 10 hotels contracted in the room block for the Greenbuild conference in Toronto. As part of their award-winning sustainable event program, the conference organizers embedded green practices into the contract language for these hotels, who either had to comply with the requirements, explain their reason why they couldn’t implement them, or pay a $1,000 fine. Part of our consulting work was to gather the data and confirm some of the practices on-site. Read on...

Susan Tinnish

Hotels brands have actively engaged in large-scale efforts to become more environmentally friendly. Individual hotels have made great strides on property. Many significant large-scale eco-initiatives s are most easily built initially into the infrastructure and design of the building and surrounding areas. Given that the adaptation of these large-scale changes into the existing asset base is expensive and disruptive, hotels seek different ways to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and eco-friendly practices. One way to do so is to shift the focus from large-scale change to “small wins.” Small wins can help a hotel create a culture of sustainability. Read on...

Shannon Sentman

Utility costs are the second largest operating expense for most hotels. Successfully reducing these expenses can be a huge value-add strategy for executives. Doing this effectively requires more than just a one-time investment in efficiency upgrades. It requires ongoing visibility into a building’s performance and effectively leveraging this visibility to take action. Too often, efficiency strategies center on a one-time effort to identify opportunities with little consideration for establishing ongoing practices to better manage a building’s performance ongoing. Read on...

Joshua Zinder, AIA

Discussions of sustainability in the hospitality industry have focused mainly on strategies at the level of energy-efficient and eco-friendly adjustments to operations and maintenance. These "tweaks" can include programs to reduce water usage, updating lighting to LEDs, campaigns to increase guest participation in recycling, and similar innovative industry initiatives. Often overlooked—not only by industry experts but even by hotel operators and designers—are possibilities for hotel design and construction that can make a property truly sustainable from the get-go. Read on...

Coming Up In The June Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Sales & Marketing: Who Owns the Guest?
Hotels and OTAs are, by necessity, joined at the hip and locked in a symbiotic relationship that is uneasy at best. Hotels require the marketing presence that OTAs offer and of course, OTAs guest’s email when it sends guest information to a hotel, effectively allowing OTAs to maintain “ownership” of the guest. Without ready access to guest need hotel product to offer their online customers. But recently, several OTAs have decided to no longer share a data, hotels are severely constrained from marketing directly to a guest which allows them to capture repeat business – the lowest cost and highest value travelers. Hotels also require this data to effectively market to previous guests, so ownership of this data will be a significant factor as hotels and OTAs move forward. Another issue is the increasing shift to mobile travel bookings. Mobile will account for more than half of all online travel bookings next year, and 78.6% of them will use their smartphone to make those reservations. As a result, hotels must have a robust mobile marketing plan in place, which means responsive design, one-click booking, and location technology. Another important mobile marketing element is a “Click-to-Call” feature. According to a recent Google survey, 68% of hotel guests report that it is extremely/very important to be able to call a hotel during the purchase phase, and 58% are very likely to call a hotel if the capability is available in a smartphone search. The June Hotel Business Review will report on some of these issues and strategies, and examine how some sales and marketing professionals are integrating them into their operations.