Cultural Tourism
John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • The Architectural Attraction: How Great Architecture Attracts Tourism
  • Within the past decade, many of the nation's leading museums and concert halls have hired starchitects the likes of Gehry, Calatrava, Libeskind, and Taniguchi to create singularly stunning structures that, like massive titanium magnets, attract visitors to them. So, too, hoteliers are renovating landmark buildings in major cities into new use as signature hotels. Branded destinations are exporting their architectural concepts abroad. Read on...

Andrew Freeman
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Cultural Diversity - A World of Opportunity
  • Diversity is no longer a lofty idea for the future and wishful thinking. Nor is it something regional affecting select sections of the country. From vendors to guests, staff to neighbors, diversity is here, it is now, it is universal. Revisiting existing strategies and tactics and implementing new ones to accommodate true diversity and inclusion in your hotel is not only socially responsible, it is just good business. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Partnerships in Preservation: Sustainable Heritage Tourism
  • Tourism has become recognized as essential to sustaining historic preservation and California's tourism industry is responding to that reality. Responding to encouragement by President George W. Bush's historic preservation advisor, John Nau, III, Californians organized a California Cultural Heritage Tourism Council in 2004 which subsequently has sponsored symposia and efforts to connect tourism with cultural and heritage preservation. "We recognized that California's vast geography and diverse heritage and cultures kept tourism, cultural and heritage leaders from speaking to one another and thus cooperating. By coming together, we have been able to generate highly visible promotional efforts and stimulate cooperation, to the benefit of preservation," says Susan Wilcox, co-chair of the California Cultural Heritage Tourism Council and Deputy Director of the California Travel and Tourism Commission. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • China, from Exclusion to Inclusion
  • In response to increasing financial and cultural ties between China and the United States, both countries have eased travel restrictions. The China National Tourism Administration (CNTA) and U.S. Department of Commerce recently announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which is intended to boost travel between the two countries and serve to "strengthen relations and forge new friendships." The MOU opens China's growing market to U.S. travel and tourism industries with a push toward expanding group leisure travel from China to the U.S. CNTA Chairman Shao Qiwei sees it as broadening exchange and cooperation between the countries in economic, cultural and air service areas. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Cultural Event Marketing: How hotels are profiting from cultural events
  • Cultural events have long been touted by arts organizations as benefiting hotels. Research studies by the Los Angeles County-based organizations prove the claim. In the late 1990s and again in the early 2000s, the effectiveness of major art exhibits to attract visitors to Los Angeles County were studied by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and by The Museum of Contemporary Art as driven by LA's Cultural Tourism Department. Those studies documented not just the economic and social impact of major Vincent Van Gogh and Andy Warhol exhibitions, but proved once and for all time that strong exhibits - effectively promoted - attract out-of-town visitors, sell rooms and can be extremely lucrative to hotels. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • Heritage Corridors: Routes to Increased Occupancy
  • When limited markets are divided among competing hotels with similar facilities and services, hoteliers find that new guests can be attracted and hotel occupancy increased by revisiting the past. They've discovered that heritage corridors create additional reasons to travel a route, be loyal to a property and stay longer. These less-traveled corridors were once the beaten path, but now have nostalgic appeal for travelers in search of a slower pace, authenticity and our nation's history. Read on...

John Poimiroo
  • Cultural Tourism
  • The Cultural Heritage Tourist
  • According to The Historic/Cultural Traveler, a weathered, but oft-quoted 2003 study by the Travel Industry Association of America and Smithsonian Magazine, more than half of U.S. adults (over 118 million people) include at least one art, history, humanities or heritage activity or event when they travel. You find them swaying to exotic music at cultural events, festivals and fairs. They're drawn to ethnic neighborhoods for authentic foods and imports. Clusters of them are seen looking skyward as they walk through historic districts on guided architectural tours. Others are involved in volunteer projects to both immerse themselves in a destination while helping to preserve it. They walk battlefields, often as knowledgeable about what took place as are local guides. The travel stories they retell are of the cultural treasures they saw and the remarkable local people they met. Read on...

MARCH: Human Resources: Inspiring a Journey of Success

Cara Silletto

Ever wonder what planet your new hires are from? For most, it is called Millennialland. It is my homeland, and it is a whole different world than where Boomers and GenXers were born. So why are your younger workers from this strange land so hard to understand, manage and retain? Why is it that they lack the loyalty of those who came before them? Why do they need so much handholding in the workplace? And where does this tremendous sense of entitlement come from? Allow me to explain. Read on...

Nicole Price

You’re just being politically correct! In America, being politically correct has taken a new meaning and now has a negative connotation. But why? Definitions can help identify the reason. The definition of political correctness is “the avoidance, often considered as taken to extremes, of forms of expression or action that are perceived to exclude, marginalize, or insult groups of people who are socially discriminated against.” In simple terms, political correctness is going to the extreme to avoid insulting socially disadvantaged groups. What could be wrong with that? The issue is not them or the term, it’s us! Read on...

Kimberly Abel-Lanier

Engaging and retaining talented, trained workers is a critical component of success for any business in any sector. When employees are disengaged or turnover is high, organizations face challenges of subpar customer service, high costs, and human resource inefficiencies. Gallup estimates rampant disengagement among employees costs American businesses between $450 billion and $550 billion per year. High turnover also carries exorbitant costs to organizations, averaging approximately 1.5x an employee’s salary for replacement. In the hospitality sector, delivery of impactful customer experiences is strongly connected to employee engagement and satisfaction. Happy, engaged employees can make happy, loyal customers. Currently; however, the hospitality sector suffers higher than average employee turnover. Read on...

Michael Warech

So where will we find the next generation of leaders in the hospitality industry? Like their counterparts in other business sectors, this question remains top-of-mind for those responsible for finding, managing, and developing the talent needed to ensure the vitality of their organizations. While, arguably, not as glamorous as a new guest amenity or as important as a cost-saving innovation, there is nothing more critical than talent to succeed in an increasingly competitive and challenging global business environment. Leveraging the best strategies and tactics related to talent management, succession planning, workforce planning, training and leadership development are, quite possibly, a company’s most critical work. Read on...

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.