Revenue Management
David Lund
  • Revenue Management
  • Creating Financial Leadership in Your Hotel
  • Hotel forecast magic. The how to vs. the want to. Have you ever wondered why it’s so hard to get the non-financial manages in your hotel to do their forecasts? It’s like pulling teeth, it’s so hard to get the leaders in your hotel to willingly come to the plate. What if you’re asking for their forecasts in the wrong way? Here is what I learned and I want to call myself out on this because it took me 20 years to figure it out. Maybe it will work for you too and you won’t have to waste 20 years. Read on...

Jeff Navach
  • Revenue Management
  • Eliminating Acquisition Costs to Get Heads in Beds
  • What if I told you there was an easy and effective way to bypass the OTAs, reduce fees, and capture audiences you aren’t currently accessing? And I’m not talking about a new idea or outrageous untested concept. I’m simply talking about a change in the way you think about digital marketing. It’s a process that the OTAs have deployed for years that hotel marketers can do every bit as effectively as the OTAs. Hotels continue to confront a familiar problem: How to attract direct bookings and reduce the impact of OTA fees. We all know how profitable it is when bookings come straight through the hotel, but there simply isn’t enough reach to drive the same demand as the OTAs. Read on...

David Hogan
  • Revenue Management
  • Understanding the EMV Fraud Liability Shift
  • Even though it’s been almost 18 months since the U.S. migrated to EMV smart-chip based payment technology, many businesses – for various reasons – are still hesitant to get on board. Many hotel property management system products don’t support EMV acceptance, even though almost 80 percent of credit cards are now issued with smart chips. In fact, credit card issuers prioritized which cards were issued with chips first, which included high-limit international or travel cards – the types of cards being used often in hotels. Without the ability to accept EMV transactions, business owners – including hoteliers like you – are seeing liability shift chargebacks for which there is no defense. Read on...

David Chitlik
  • Revenue Management
  • Tax Assessments Based on Value in Use, or Value in Exchange
  • Regardless of property type, tax assessment valuation would appear simple enough. A generally accepted definition of market value is: The probable price, as of a specified date, in cash, or in terms equivalent to cash, or in other precisely revealed terms, for which the specified property rights should sell after reasonable exposure in a competitive market under all conditions requisite to a fair sale, with the buyer and seller each acting prudently, knowledgeably, and for self-interest, and assuming that neither is under undue duress. Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk
  • Revenue Management
  • Driving Maximum Profit Through More Direct Bookings
  • Driving Maximum Profit through More Direct Booking: In today’s ultra-competitive hotel environment, every dollar counts. Any competitive edge that translates into a stronger bottom line is sought out, and every piece of hotel business is evaluated to determine its true worth. With rising costs associated with acquiring new guests through third-party platforms, hotels are rightly considering their most effective booking channels and looking to maximize business from owned assets like their own website. Read on...

Bob Mattler
  • Revenue Management
  • Improve Profits With Renovation, Redevelopment and New Construction
  • There is a new innovative way to pay for hospitality construction projects: Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. PACE, adopted as enabling legislation in 32 states and with active programs in about half of them, is gaining momentum as a flexible, available and creative tool in which to finance almost any technology that saves energy and/ or water. PACE can take the place of expensive loans or additional owner equity to finance construction projects that can be repaid long term from those very same energy and water savings. This article will explain Property Assessed Clean Energy, who pays for PACE, some common building systems ripe for PACE financing, who is using PACE and why. We’ll take a closer look through some case studies how hospitality developers and owners are already taking advantage of this new economic development tool. Read on...

Bernard Ellis
  • Revenue Management
  • Achieving Total Revenue Management with Your Existing RMS
  • Technology is often blamed for raising the biggest barrier to embracing a “total revenue management” approach. But chances are that you have systems in place that are already up to the task, if only you would set them up to succeed. You may need to make PMS configuration changes and refine certain business practices, but it will be more than worth it. It seems like every time RevPAR growth slows down, as it is now in the US, hoteliers instinctively turn first to investigate their revenue management systems, which surely must have blown a fuse or broken a fan belt or something. Read on...

Paul van Meerendonk
Trevor Stuart-Hill
  • Revenue Management
  • Should We be Concerned About ADR?
  • Reliance on growing ADR to drive RevPAR when occupancy levels plateau isn’t as easy as it sounds. Reactionary pricing moves, whether they be automated or human in origin will undoubtedly result in subpar performance. This article serves as an early warning that now is the time to take action to ensure that you don’t fall victim to your dumbest competitor. Projections for 2017 and beyond by STR, CBRE and PKF all call for anemic occupancy growth at best, notwithstanding record occupancy levels for the U.S. hospitality industry. With Revenue Per Available Room (RevPAR) growth projections at inflationary levels (2.5 – 3.5 percent, or so), it is clear that expectations call for Average Daily Rate (ADR) growth to continue, but will it? Read on...

Tammy Farley
  • Revenue Management
  • Three Game-Changing Hospitality Trends for 2017
  • There is an old adage that says, “The only constant is change.” Although attributed to Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher who lived around 500 B.C., apparently that statement is as true now as it has ever been – perhaps even more so. 2016 has proven to be a year of tumultuous change in the hospitality industry, from the dizzying pace of technological advancements and fluctuating global economies to the introduction and adoption of entire new segments of the business. With rapidly advancing technologies in just about every sector of the industry, hospitality has experienced an exponential transformation over the past several years, dramatically changing the face of one of the world’s oldest occupations. Read on...

Ravneet Bhandari
  • Revenue Management
  • Dynamic Vs. Static Segmentation: Who are Your Real Competitors?
  • Revenue managers spend considerable time observing and reviewing their competitive set. After all, they’ve had historical success looking at the hotels with similar pricing and amenities. It’s been the stalwart approach to decoding the price forecasting puzzle. As an industry, we’ve commonly accepted this is the right way to do things. But be warned, this approach is like looking at a spectacular mountain. Every angle around the mountain looks different to the observer, with each view revealing bite sized pieces of the overall picture. The reader starts with a full-page image, but when seen from another angle, an entirely different picture is revealed. Revenue managers are so busy looking at their competition through a ‘partial’ image, they cannot see the full picture. Read on...

David Chitlik
  • Revenue Management
  • Can Any Hotel Sale Really be Used as a 'Comparable'?
  • A hotel is not the same as a house or a warehouse or an apartment or office building, and assessors often don’t understand why. The hospitality sector is frequently the most challenging part of a jurisdiction’s property tax base. The only way to derive a hotel’s real property value from a purchase price is for an assessor to spend time and energy understanding the adjustments needed to accurately determine what part of that purchase price relates to real property and whether or not it can be used as a sales comparable for other hotels in that jurisdiction. Read on...

Natasa Christodoulidou
  • Revenue Management
  • Pros and Cons of RevPAR vs GOPPAR
  • Revenue Management, also known as yield management, may be defined as the process of analyzing, anticipating, and impacting consumer behavior to maximize the profits from a fixed perishable resource, primarily hotel guest rooms and airline passenger seats (Christodoulidou, Berezina, Cobanoglu, 2012). Revenue management, including overbooking and dynamic pricing, has been an enormously important innovation in the service industry (Netessine & Shumsky, 2002). For example, a number of airlines overbook their reservations for a particular flight by 14% since on average they expect a 10% to 20% no shows on flights. The Marriott hotel chain credits its revenue management system for generating additional revenue of about $100 million per fiscal year. Read on...

Kristie Dickinson
  • Revenue Management
  • Top 5 Issues Impacting Revenue Management This Budget Season
  • Revenue management continues to be one of the most important aspects of profitably operating a hotel, though it also remains one of the most difficult to grasp fully. Last year, I wrote an article on the Top 5 Questions Hotel Owners Should Be Asking About Revenue Management, which focused on conversations that owners should be having with their operators about setting goals, analyzing data and how best to measure results, all good primer leading up to budget season. To further the discussion, I will highlight some specific issues below that bear relevance in today’s market Read on...

Steve  Van
  • Revenue Management
  • Paralysis From Over-Analysis
  • We have all heard the old cliché that “less is more”, and, while there is a grain of truth in the notion that simplicity and clarity are sometimes preferable to complexity, the reality is that, regardless of the circumstances, more information is almost always a better bet. Today we are seeing the tension between these two ideas play out in the hotel industry, where revenue management has exploded with new approaches in recent years–almost all of it facilitated by an avalanche of previously ignored or unavailable data. Consider just how sophisticated revenue management has become in the hotel industry. Read on...

1234 ...22 Next →

FEBRUARY: Social Media: Interacting with the Hotel Customer

Eugenio Pirri

In the service sector, people are the lynchpin of any business, and success or failure hinges upon them. Though this success can only be unlocked if employees are spotted, nurtured, engaged and developed; the key to which is great hotel leadership. In this exclusive article for Hotel Executive, Vice President for People and Organisational Development at luxury management company, Dorchester Collection, and author of Be A People Leader, Eugenio Pirri, explores what it takes to be a people leader in the 21st Century and why businesses across the world are currently experiencing a leadership deficit. Read on...

Marigrace McKay

Human Resource leaders in all business sectors are stumped by how to hire the talented employees needed by their businesses in order to meet company strategic objectives. This responsibility is especially difficult in the service sector of hospitality. In no other sector is the one-to-one personal connection more important, perhaps with the exception of medical providers. In hospitality, an employees’ air, attitude, a wrong word or gesture can be perceived badly by the customer – a kiss of death. Or, with another customer the same circumstances can be received with over the top joy, acclaim, compliments, and kudos – a big win! Read on...

Peter McAlpine

There is increasing awareness in the hotel industry that something intangible is missing in hospitality because generally speaking it is not making the sought-after emotional and energetic connection to the guest’s heart, which will increase revenue and make guests flock to the brand. Hospitality still feels energetically and emotionally weak in spite of all efforts to change this, and I would like to shed some light on why this is so. In short, the hotel industry would make the connection and revolutionise hospitality by changing from the mechanistic Newtonian worldview to the energetic Quantum worldview, which replaced it in 1925. Read on...

Roberta Chinsky Matuson

The U.S. labor market continues to tighten with The Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting a decline in the unemployment rate to 4.6 percent in November of 2016. The unemployment rate is even lower in many states and metropolitan areas. Unrealistic expectations and increased stress, due to staffing shortages, is causing many employees to reconsider their current work situations. Many will soon choose to depart. This will only add to the need for organizations to involve more than HR, if they are to fill job openings promptly or at all. Read on...

Coming Up In The March Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Human Resources: Inspiring a Journey of Success
In an increasingly competitive environment where hotels are competing to attract, and more importantly, to keep top talent, Human Resource managers are realizing the need to focus on improving their Employee Experience. Smart managers are embracing the idea of Employee Wellness which translates into a system of physical, mental, emotional, and purposeful well-being. Some organizations are even providing free counseling for their employees and their dependents. The goal is to nurture, support and engage with their employees in a way that increases productivity, improves customer service, enhances loyalty, and creates a more harmonious work environment for all. Along with this development is the need for more effective, ongoing training. Many HR managers rely on external training firms for this, but there is a growing trend which taps the experience and expertise that already exists within the organization. For example, younger employees likely have greater knowledge of social media which an older generation might struggle with. Harnessing this peer-to-peer learning can be an efficient and cost effective way of increasing skills, and as a result, the knowledge transferred is likely to be more acceptable and relevant. Finally, HR managers need to foster an environment that empowers people and taps into their full potential, inspiring a personal journey of success. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the strategies and techniques that human resource directors are currently developing in order to achieve success.