Mr. Favre

Eric Favre

Managing Director

The Alpina Gstaad

Eric Favre, a distinguished hotelier with 30 years of experience at luxury properties in Europe, Southeast Asia and Africa, is the Managing Director of The Alpina Gstaad, the first luxury hotel to open in the Swiss Alpine resort in 100 years. He was appointed to the position on October 1, 2013.

Prior to joining The Alpina Gstaad, Mr. Favre was General Manager of the Djibouti Palace Kempinski in Africa. He spent ten years as General Manager of Le Mirador Kempinski in Le Mont Pelerin, Switzerland. From 1996 to 1999, he served as Director of the Hotel Management School Les Roches in Bluche, Crans Montana. Mr. Favre has held executive positions in such revered hotels as The Oriental in Bangkok and Al Khozama in Riyadh, a Leading Hotel of the World.

A native of the Canton of Vaud, Mr. Favre graduated from the Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne and later received a Diplôme de Chef d'Entreprise de la Société Suisse des Hôteliers. In 1998, Mr. Favre was awarded a Master of Science Degree in Training and Development from IMC in London. He speaks French, English and German.

To stay in shape, Mr. Favre enjoys long distance running and has competed in seven marathons. On August 9, he plans to participate in the Glacier 3000 Run that begins in the village of Gstaad and climbs almost 6,400 feet to the Glacier and back. Mr. Favre will run the first – and most difficult – 13 miles.

Mr. Favre can be contacted at 41-033-888-9888 or efavre@thealpinagstaad.ch

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.