Mr. Favre

Eric Favre

Managing Director

The Alpina Gstaad

Eric Favre, a distinguished hotelier with 30 years of experience at luxury properties in Europe, Southeast Asia and Africa, is the Managing Director of The Alpina Gstaad, the first luxury hotel to open in the Swiss Alpine resort in 100 years. He was appointed to the position on October 1, 2013.

Prior to joining The Alpina Gstaad, Mr. Favre was General Manager of the Djibouti Palace Kempinski in Africa. He spent ten years as General Manager of Le Mirador Kempinski in Le Mont Pelerin, Switzerland. From 1996 to 1999, he served as Director of the Hotel Management School Les Roches in Bluche, Crans Montana. Mr. Favre has held executive positions in such revered hotels as The Oriental in Bangkok and Al Khozama in Riyadh, a Leading Hotel of the World.

A native of the Canton of Vaud, Mr. Favre graduated from the Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne and later received a Diplôme de Chef d'Entreprise de la Société Suisse des Hôteliers. In 1998, Mr. Favre was awarded a Master of Science Degree in Training and Development from IMC in London. He speaks French, English and German.

To stay in shape, Mr. Favre enjoys long distance running and has competed in seven marathons. On August 9, he plans to participate in the Glacier 3000 Run that begins in the village of Gstaad and climbs almost 6,400 feet to the Glacier and back. Mr. Favre will run the first – and most difficult – 13 miles.

Mr. Favre can be contacted at 41-033-888-9888 or efavre@thealpinagstaad.ch

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.