Ms. Mockus

Eileen Mockus

CEO

Coyuchi

Eileen Mockus is Chief Executive Officer of Coyuchi, Inc., makers of organic and natural bedding, bath linens, sleepwear, table linens and other home textiles. A natural lifestyle pioneer, Coyuchi was founded more than 20 years ago in the California coastal village of Point Reyes Station. Today, Coyuchi is a rapidly emerging home textile brand with national recognition in the media and a retail internet presence growing at over 60% per year---testimony to an enthusiastic and devoted national customer following.

Before joining Coyuchi as Vice President of Product Development in 2011. Ms. Mockus gained practical, technical and entrepreneurial experience working in textile production, sourcing and materials testing for such iconic brands as North Face, Patagonia and Pottery Barn Kids.

Developing a passion for textiles in her youth, Ms. Mockus holds a Bachelor of Science in Textile and Clothing from the University of California, Davis, where she graduated with college and department honors. She subsequently earned a Masters of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis on Small Business and Entrepreneurship at San Francisco State University.

Ms. Mockus is steadfastly committed to the values of the Coyuchi brand, as expressed by the quality, touch and reverent sourcing of all the company’s products. Under her leadership, Coyuchi’s cotton products have secured certification to the Global Organic Textile Standard, the world’s leading textile processing standard for organic fibers, and the launch of furniture and table linen categories.

Ms. Mockus has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area for many years with her husband, two children and three cats.

Ms. Mockus can be contacted at 888-418-8847 or emockus@coyuchi.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.