Ms. Mockus

Eileen Mockus

CEO

Coyuchi

Eileen Mockus is Chief Executive Officer of Coyuchi, Inc., makers of organic and natural bedding, bath linens, sleepwear, table linens and other home textiles. A natural lifestyle pioneer, Coyuchi was founded more than 20 years ago in the California coastal village of Point Reyes Station. Today, Coyuchi is a rapidly emerging home textile brand with national recognition in the media and a retail internet presence growing at over 60% per year---testimony to an enthusiastic and devoted national customer following.

Before joining Coyuchi as Vice President of Product Development in 2011. Ms. Mockus gained practical, technical and entrepreneurial experience working in textile production, sourcing and materials testing for such iconic brands as North Face, Patagonia and Pottery Barn Kids.

Developing a passion for textiles in her youth, Ms. Mockus holds a Bachelor of Science in Textile and Clothing from the University of California, Davis, where she graduated with college and department honors. She subsequently earned a Masters of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis on Small Business and Entrepreneurship at San Francisco State University.

Ms. Mockus is steadfastly committed to the values of the Coyuchi brand, as expressed by the quality, touch and reverent sourcing of all the company’s products. Under her leadership, Coyuchi’s cotton products have secured certification to the Global Organic Textile Standard, the world’s leading textile processing standard for organic fibers, and the launch of furniture and table linen categories.

Ms. Mockus has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area for many years with her husband, two children and three cats.

Ms. Mockus can be contacted at 888-418-8847 or emockus@coyuchi.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.