Mr. Buck

Randy Buck

Executive Chef

Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans

Chef Randy Buck has served as Executive Chef at the historic Hotel Monteleone for nearly 20 years and has overseen the menu direction of the Hunt Room Grill, Le Café, the Aft-Deck Oyster Bar and the Hotel’s newest outlet Criollo Restaurant, which focuses on a local ingredient driven seasonal menu.

A native of Tennessee, Chef Buck was first introduced to fine dining at the age of 17, serving initially as a Line Cook for the well-known Club Corporation of America and later progressing to Executive Chef of their various private dining clubs.

Focusing on a pasture to plate ideology that stems back to his youth, Chef Buck describes his style of cooking as Louisiana Contemporary taking fresh approaches to classic dishes.

Chef Buck has appeared in numerous national media publications and made several appearances on national food network television stations including Wheel of Fortune (“Great Chefs of New Orleans”), The Travel Channel, Food Network and The Food Channel. In April 2013, the American Culinary Federation New Orleans Chapter named Executive Chef Randy Buck of Hotel Monteleone as the 2013 Chef of the Year.

Mr. Buck can be contacted at 504.523.3341 or rbuck@hotelmonteleone.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.