Ms. Evans Parker

Deborah Evans Parker

Principal

Deborah Evans & Associates, LLC

Deborah Evans Parker is the founder and principal of Deborah Evans & Associates and has created and designed, developed, consulted, marketed and managed select destination, resort and day spas and salons throughout her career. With over twenty - five years of hands on spa experience and a proven track record. Ms. Evans is a dynamic visionary and recognized industry leader in planning, programming, marketing and public relations and successful management of hotel and spa operations.

As a perpetual student, spa chef, licensed massage and spa therapist, author, educator and spa aficionado, Ms. Evans has developed a unique background and expertise in spa cuisine, massage and spa therapies, fitness and outdoor recreational programs and holistic health. Combined with expertise in strategic business development, branding and imaging, retail development and management, staff development and team dynamics and sales and service training.

Ms. Evans is a highly sought after spa and salon consultant, providing expert advice to both new and existing spas. Seeing both a need and an opportunity, Deborah launched her new spa and salon distribution company in 2010 and now represents ten quality spa and salon brands in the national US market.

Ms. Evans oversaw the development and repositioning of two leading destination spas, Lake Austin Spa Resort in Austin, Texas and Red Mountain Spa in St. George, Utah. Serving as General Manager of both of these "top ten" spas, Evans oversaw the re-tooling of "Bermuda Inn" to "Lake Austin" and "National Institute of Fitness" to "Red Mountain Spa".

Sensing a need and an opportunity in the industry, Evans developed and conducted a spa management training program and founded her spa consulting business in 1995 and was selected to develop The Grand Floridian Spa at Disney World in Orlando, Florida as her initial project.

As a spa industry expert, Ms. Evans has been interviewed and quoted in hundreds of publications and by most leading spa, health, and beauty and travel publications.

Ms. Evans has served on The International Spa Association Board of Directors and Foundation Board. She currently serves as President of the Spa Consulting Chapter of the Institute of Management Consultants and is dedicated to setting ethical standards and certification for spa consultants. She is a member of the International Spa Association, The Institute of Management Consultants and The Manufacturer Agents National Association.

Ms. Evans Parker can be contacted at 901-221-8283 or deborah@devansassociates.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, its that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.