Ms. Skaife

Jennifer Skaife

Design Director

DiLeonardo

As Design Director at DiLeonardo, Jennifer Skaife believes the process of reaching successful design solutions will be enriched by the participation of all DiLeonardo team members and encourages young talented designers to offer up ideas and concepts from the get go.

Ms. Skaife studied Fine Art & Sculpture at Banbury School of Art, Oxfordshire, England and received a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) Degree in Three Dimensional Design/Interior Design from The City of Birmingham Polytechnic (now Birmingham Institute of Art & Design) in England. Ms. Skaife has also served as a guest critic at California State University Long Beach.

One of the legacies of Ms. Skaife’s childhood in the Scottish Highlands is a deep love of wilderness and open spaces. She holds a Wilderness Advanced First Aid certification and when not working she likes to be outdoors with her dogs. She enjoys camping, backpacking, and ocean kayaking. Ms. Skaife also tries to spend at least one week a year on a silent meditation retreat.

Ms. Skaife believes that the early involvement of all project design disciplines – in other words get as much information about the project up front from as many sources as possible - leads to greater innovation which ultimately leads to reaching exceptional design solutions. A strong design and aesthetic sensibility, supported by ‘off the cuff’ sketching skills, has enriched her process in successfully leading her design teams through challenging project demands from Concept through to Construction. There is rarely a day that valuable words and examples set by past mentors do not come to mind.

Ms. Skaife can be contacted at 401-732-2900 or jskaife@dileonardo.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.