Ms. Bulger

Diana K. Bulger

Area Director of Public Relations

Fairmont Hotels

Diana K. Bulger joined Fairmont in 2003. She has created events and formed alliances for the hotel with numerous organizations such as The Make-Wish Foundation, The World Wildlife Fund, The Washington Animal Rescue League, The Smithsonian Institution, and Guiding Eyes for the Blind and several others. She serves as the Eco-Chair of the Fairmontís environmental committee.

Prior to joining the Fairmont, she was vice president of Hisaoka Public Relations where she handled to opening public relations efforts for five Kimpton Hotels. Previously, she was the president of Kaiser Communications, a hospitality public relations company.

From 1990 to 1998, she was the regional director of public relations for Loews Hotels in Washington, DC and Annapolis, Maryland. She was the director of public relations for the Hotel Washington from 1987 -1990

Ms. Bulger began her career at the Vista International Hotel as the assistant public relations manager in 1985.

A huge animal lover, Bulger founded the Bark Ball in 1988 for The Washington Humane Society, the first black-tie ball to allow dogs in the nationís capital.

Ms. Bulger is also a second term mayoral appointee to the District of Columbia Retirement Board and a member in good standing of Destination DC. She has penned columns for the Greater Washington Association Executives Magazine Executive Update and Potomac Life Magazine. She attended Oldfields School in Glencoe, Maryland and Franklin College in Lugano, Switzerland. She resides in Washington, DC with her Husband, transportation lobbyist, Thomas J. Bulger and their three dogs.

Ms. Bulger can be contacted at 800-441-1414 or diana.bulger@fairmont.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, itís that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort Ė one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms Ė they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.