Ms. Bulger

Diana K. Bulger

Area Director of Public Relations

Fairmont Hotels

Diana K. Bulger joined Fairmont in 2003. She has created events and formed alliances for the hotel with numerous organizations such as The Make-Wish Foundation, The World Wildlife Fund, The Washington Animal Rescue League, The Smithsonian Institution, and Guiding Eyes for the Blind and several others. She serves as the Eco-Chair of the Fairmontís environmental committee.

Prior to joining the Fairmont, she was vice president of Hisaoka Public Relations where she handled to opening public relations efforts for five Kimpton Hotels. Previously, she was the president of Kaiser Communications, a hospitality public relations company.

From 1990 to 1998, she was the regional director of public relations for Loews Hotels in Washington, DC and Annapolis, Maryland. She was the director of public relations for the Hotel Washington from 1987 -1990

Ms. Bulger began her career at the Vista International Hotel as the assistant public relations manager in 1985.

A huge animal lover, Bulger founded the Bark Ball in 1988 for The Washington Humane Society, the first black-tie ball to allow dogs in the nationís capital.

Ms. Bulger is also a second term mayoral appointee to the District of Columbia Retirement Board and a member in good standing of Destination DC. She has penned columns for the Greater Washington Association Executives Magazine Executive Update and Potomac Life Magazine. She attended Oldfields School in Glencoe, Maryland and Franklin College in Lugano, Switzerland. She resides in Washington, DC with her Husband, transportation lobbyist, Thomas J. Bulger and their three dogs.

Ms. Bulger can be contacted at 800-441-1414 or diana.bulger@fairmont.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.