Mr. Bush

Christopher Bush

Executive Vice President

Canyon Equity LLC

Christopher Bush has acquired broad operational and re-positioning experience in the luxury hospitality segment. A native of the UK, Mr. Bush’s multi-faceted career has taken him to five countries across three continents.

As Executive Vice President of Canyon Equity LLC, Mr. Bush is one of the executives who in 2005 formed the original core of this resort development and acquisition firm based near San Francisco. Mr. Bush heads up asset management for the company’s six operating resorts. Canyon’s properties include three Aman resorts, namely Le Mélézin in the French Alps, Amangiri in Utah, and Amangani at Jackson Hole, also the Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado in Santa Fe, and the Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort in Fiji.

Canyon Equity developed the ultra-luxury Amangiri resort (Utah) from the ground up, opening in October 2009. The resort was an immediate success and has been the recipient of innumerable awards and accolades in the short time since its opening.

Mr. Bush also directs Canyon’s hotel management subsidiary, Canyon Hotel & Resorts, which currently manages the Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort in the Fiji Islands. This entity is set up to take additional resorts under its management as the company expands.

Mr. Bush has managed some very notable hotels and resorts including Jumby Bay in Antigua, The Stanford Court in San Francisco, Palmilla Resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, and Pinehurst Resort in North Carolina. Earlier assignments include Regional Director of Marketing for Princes Hotels, based in Los Angeles and Director of Marketing for the 850-room Maria-Isabel Hotel in Mexico City

Mr. Bush can be contacted at 415-925-8000 or info@canyonequity.com

Coming Up In The May Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability
The hotel industry continues to make remarkable progress in implementing sustainability policies and procedures in their properties throughout the world. As a result, they continue to reap the benefits of increased profitability, enhanced guest experiences, and improved community relations. In addition, as industry standards are codified and adopted worldwide, hotels can now compare how their operations measure up against their competitors in terms of sustainable practices and accomplishments. This capacity to publicly compare and contrast is spurring competition and driving innovation as hotels do not wish to be left behind in this area. Water management and conservation is still a primary issue as population growth, urbanization, pollution and wasteful consumption patterns place increasing demands on freshwater supply. Water recycling; installing low-flow fixtures; using digital sensors to control water usage; and even harvesting rainwater are just a few things that some hotels are doing to preserve this precious resource. Waste management is another major concern. Through policies of reduce, reuse and recycle, some hotels are implementing “zero-waste” programs with the goal of substantially reducing their landfill waste which produces carbon dioxide and methane gases. Other hotels have established comprehensive training programs that reinforce the value of sustainability. There is employee engagement through posters and quizzes, and even contests are held to increase innovation, sensitivity and environmental awareness. Some hotels are also monitoring a guest’s energy usage and rewarding those who consumed less energy with gifts and incentives. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating eco-friendly practices into their operations and how they and the environment are benefiting from them.