Mr. Bush

Christopher Bush

Executive Vice President

Canyon Equity LLC

Christopher Bush has acquired broad operational and re-positioning experience in the luxury hospitality segment. A native of the UK, Mr. Bush’s multi-faceted career has taken him to five countries across three continents.

As Executive Vice President of Canyon Equity LLC, Mr. Bush is one of the executives who in 2005 formed the original core of this resort development and acquisition firm based near San Francisco. Mr. Bush heads up asset management for the company’s six operating resorts. Canyon’s properties include three Aman resorts, namely Le Mélézin in the French Alps, Amangiri in Utah, and Amangani at Jackson Hole, also the Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado in Santa Fe, and the Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort in Fiji.

Canyon Equity developed the ultra-luxury Amangiri resort (Utah) from the ground up, opening in October 2009. The resort was an immediate success and has been the recipient of innumerable awards and accolades in the short time since its opening.

Mr. Bush also directs Canyon’s hotel management subsidiary, Canyon Hotel & Resorts, which currently manages the Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort in the Fiji Islands. This entity is set up to take additional resorts under its management as the company expands.

Mr. Bush has managed some very notable hotels and resorts including Jumby Bay in Antigua, The Stanford Court in San Francisco, Palmilla Resort in Los Cabos, Mexico, and Pinehurst Resort in North Carolina. Earlier assignments include Regional Director of Marketing for Princes Hotels, based in Los Angeles and Director of Marketing for the 850-room Maria-Isabel Hotel in Mexico City

Mr. Bush can be contacted at 415-925-8000 or info@canyonequity.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.