Mr. Ferrara

Clifford Ferrara

Vice President of Sales & Revenue Management

Chesapeake Hospitality

Clifford Ferrara is the Vice President of Sales and Revenue Management for Chesapeake Hospitality, a leading third-party hotel management company ranked in the top 50 largest independent US operators. His leadership spans more than 30 years, including multiple brands and a wide variety of hotel types, both in a sales and operations capacity. His diverse leadership roles include responsibilities as director of sales, director of marketing, revenue management and as general manager.

Mr. Ferrara is a highly effective communicator and enthusiastic leader who can motivate a team to achieve objectives. His energy and personality are well suited to handle multiple tasks and challenges. He thrives on being resourceful and creative in his approach to sales and revenue management in order to achieve determined results.

His record of industry accomplishments include a common theme of re-positioning fledgling hotel sales and operations teams, then effectively deploying them to achieve strategic results. Mr. Ferrara successfully revitalized the sales mission and image of the 613 room Adams Mark Charlotte, the city’s largest convention hotel, nearly doubling group production during his tenure. As general manager of the Crowne Plaza Houston Downtown he effectively re-organized the sales team and improved operations efficiencies, while creating a culture a success that lead to increased food and beverage sales, improved profitability and better guest satisfaction scores.

One of Mr Ferrara’s most rewarding accomplishment was his involvement with the opening of the 315-room Crowne Plaza Hollywood Beach in Florida. As general manager, he was able to apply all of his professional skills to overcome the trials of opening a new hotel, developing the Crowne Plaza Hollywood into one of the most accomplished brand franchises.

Mr. Ferrara attended Porter-Gaud School in Charleston, South Carolina and earned a B.A. degree in English from Hampden-Sydney College. He enjoys hunting, fishing and boating, while currently residing in Annapolis, Maryland.

Mr. Ferrara can be contacted at 301-474-3307 or cferrara@chesapeakehospitality.com

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.