Ms. Gerhard

Janet Gerhard

Founder

Hospitality Gal, LLC

Janet Gerhard has extensive experience transforming the way organizations understand and manage the customer experience. By analyzing and strategically changing how organizations interact with their customers, she helps clients redefine their growth strategy and customer experience ecosystem thereby driving top-line growth and bottom line results.

In 2013, Ms. Gerhard was honored as one of HSMAI’s Top 25 Most Extraordinary Minds in Sales & Marketing. She established Hospitality Gal, LLC in 2012, and her areas of focus include:

▪ Engaging the organization in managing customer relationships, revenue, and profit. ▪ Bringing together departments that are often siloed to understand the customer perspective. ▪ Creating a persistent and unified focus on the customer in the actions the company takes. ▪ Helping the organization work together to optimize customer experience delivery. ▪ Supporting leaders in their role as cultural frontrunners in the transformation journey.

Ms. Gerhard most recently completed a consulting project with a premier lodging brand as it redefined its approach to customer experience feedback, including the implementation of a mobile-enabled guest survey, enterprise-wide social media monitoring, and real-time reporting of related quality measures.

In addition to the hospitality sector, Ms. Gerhard consults globally with automotive, business services, healthcare, logistics, manufacturing, pharmaceutical, retail, technology and telecommunication companies.

When not focused on intentional experience design and driving customer loyalty, Ms. Gerhard puts her passion for sales to use in an active partnership with CEB, the world’s leading member-based advisory company, working with its diverse client base on commercial transformations.

Prior to the launch of Hospitality Gal, Ms. Gerhard led the Hospitality sector of newBrandAnalytics, a social media intelligence company named the Venture Summit Mid-Atlantic 100 Company of the Year in 2011 and Northern Virginia Council's Hottest VC Backed Company in 2012. She spent the previous nine years with Maritz Research where she used customer lifecycle analytics to help clients capture more customer loyalty. Ms. Gerhard began her customer experience journey with The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company. She is extremely well-traveled having visited and worked in more than 30 countries.

Ms. Gerhard has a Bachelor of Science degree in Hotel Administration from Cornell University.

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/janet-gerhard/8/511/150

Ms. Gerhard can be contacted at 215-518-2425 or janet@hospitality-gal.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.