Mr. Prifti

Michael Prifti

Managing Principal

BLT Architects

Michael Prifti is an architect of significant diversity with architectural experience in new construction and adaptive re-use projects for institutional and development clients, with single-purpose and mixed-use programs. Mr. Prifti is proficient in complex project management and taking plans from concept to completion.

Mr. Prifti and BLTa recently completed the Revel Resort and Casino in Atlantic City, NJ. He led the team responsible for ensuring that all 65 architecture, design, and construction partners worked together to deliver Revel on time and within budget. Additionally, he was crucial in the design of the back-of-house facilities, making it one of the most impressive and efficient in the industry.

Additionally, Mr. Prifti has extensive mixed-use experience which includes the design of DC USA, a transit-oriented retail complex in Washington, DC and the in-progress One-2-FiveLIVE a 28,000 square foot retail and entertainment complex in Harlem, NY. DC USA has revitalized an area that had seen a troubled economic environment and One-2-Five LIVE anticipates to do the same.

Mr. Prifti has received a number of honors and awards, including the Thomas Ustick Walter Award in 2010, the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 2005, Architect of the Year from the Coalition of Commercial Real Estate Association in 2004 and 1999, and the Richard Upjohn Fellowship from the American Institute of Architects in 2002. He earned both his Master of Architecture and BA degrees from The University of Pennsylvania.

Mr. Prifti can be contacted at 215-563-3900 or hmt@blta.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.