Mr. Prifti

Michael Prifti

Managing Principal

BLT Architects

Michael Prifti is an architect of significant diversity with architectural experience in new construction and adaptive re-use projects for institutional and development clients, with single-purpose and mixed-use programs. Mr. Prifti is proficient in complex project management and taking plans from concept to completion.

Mr. Prifti and BLTa recently completed the Revel Resort and Casino in Atlantic City, NJ. He led the team responsible for ensuring that all 65 architecture, design, and construction partners worked together to deliver Revel on time and within budget. Additionally, he was crucial in the design of the back-of-house facilities, making it one of the most impressive and efficient in the industry.

Additionally, Mr. Prifti has extensive mixed-use experience which includes the design of DC USA, a transit-oriented retail complex in Washington, DC and the in-progress One-2-FiveLIVE a 28,000 square foot retail and entertainment complex in Harlem, NY. DC USA has revitalized an area that had seen a troubled economic environment and One-2-Five LIVE anticipates to do the same.

Mr. Prifti has received a number of honors and awards, including the Thomas Ustick Walter Award in 2010, the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects in 2005, Architect of the Year from the Coalition of Commercial Real Estate Association in 2004 and 1999, and the Richard Upjohn Fellowship from the American Institute of Architects in 2002. He earned both his Master of Architecture and BA degrees from The University of Pennsylvania.

Mr. Prifti can be contacted at 215-563-3900 or hmt@blta.com

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key
The challenge for hotel food and beverage operations is to serve the personal tastes and needs of an increasingly diverse population and, at the same time, to keep up with ever-evolving industry trends. In order to accomplish this, restaurateurs and hoteliers have to flex their creative muscles and pull out all the stops to satisfy their various audiences. One way to achieve this is to utilize existing food spaces in multiple ways at different times of the day. Lunch can be casual and fast, while dinnertime can be more formal and slower paced. The same restaurant can offer counter service by day but provide table service by night, with a completely different menu and atmosphere. Changes in music, lighting, uniforms and tabletop design contribute to its transformation. This multi- purpose approach seeks to meet the dining needs of guests as they change throughout the day. Today’s restaurants also have to go to great lengths to fulfill all the diverse dietary preferences of their guests. The popularity of plant-based, paleo, vegan, and gluten and allergen-free diets means that traditional menus must evolve from protein-heavy, carb-loaded offerings to those featuring more vegetables and legumes. Chefs are doing creative things with vegetables, such as experimenting with global cuisines or incorporating new vegetable hybrids into their dishes. Another trend is an emphasis on bold and creative flavors. From chili oil to sriracha to spicy maple syrup, entrees, desserts and beverages are all being enhanced with spice and heat. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document the trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.