Mr. Millili

David Millili

Chief Web Officer

Pegasus Solutions

David Millili is Chief Web Officer of Pegasus Solutions and Chief Executive Officer of Open Hospitality®, a Pegasus Solutions company. In this dual role, Mr. Millili has responsibility for Pegasus’ complete online presence, as well as Open Hospitality’s industry-leading internet marketing services.

Prior to joining Pegasus, Mr. Millili founded and led Open Hospitality to become a recognized industry leader in providing hotel internet marketing services, including design, website development and hosting, mobile platforms, online search and marketing.

Mr. Millili has more than 20 years of experience in the hospitality industry. As a former hotel general manager, he has practical experience in all aspects of hotel operations and management. As the GM of two New York Times Square hotels (the Mayfair New York and the Belvedere Hotel), his experiences range from managing pre-opening operations to spearheading budgets in excess of $5 million annually.

As co-founder of Timeless Hospitality, Mr. Millili was directly responsible for the successful launch of a startup company that generated profits within six months of launch, generated over $20 million in revenues for hotel clients in 2002 and raised $1.5 million in venture capital funds. Timeless Hospitality provided hotels with internet reservations, marketing and management products and was one of the first e-commerce platforms developed for the exclusive purpose of generating web reservations for independent hotels.

Mr. Millili currently teaches a course on distribution at New York University’s School of Continuing and Professional Studies at the Tisch Center for Hospitality, Tourism and Sports Management.

Mr. Millili can be contacted at 888-431-0700 or william.collins@e-hps.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.