Mr. Barth

Stephen Barth

Founder

HospitalityLawyer.com

Stephen Barth, author of Hospitality Law and coauthor of Restaurant Law Basics, is an attorney, the founder of HospitalityLawyer.com, the annual Hospitality Law Conference series, and the Global Congress on Legal, Safety, and Security Solutions in Travel. As a professor at the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management at the University of Houston, he teaches courses in hospitality law and leadership. He has over twenty years of experience in hospitality operations, including line positions, management, and ownership.

Professor Barth is a founding member of the Hospitality Industry Bar Association. He is a member of the State Bar of Texas. He is also a mediator and a strong proponent for alternative dispute resolution.

In addition to being a resource for travel and hospitality press, Professor Barth and his work have been quoted in the New York Times, USAToday, and the Houston Business Journal among others.

Professor Barth’s articles on legal and leadership issues have appeared in Lodging Hospitality, Hotel and Motel Management, CHEERS, NightClub and Bar, and HospitalityLawyer.com. He speaks regularly on many issues for the travel, lodging, restaurant, club, and health care industries.

His presentations focus on emotional intelligence, social intelligence, positive leadership techniques, and methods for preventing liability in the hospitality industry. He assisted the National Restaurant Association in developing its Safety and Security Seminar and its Responsible Service of Alcohol program. Other presentations developed by Stephen include STEM the Tide of Litigation, Positive Leadership for Positive Performance, A Model for Reducing Worker’s Compensation Costs for the Hospitality Industry, Enhancing Your Presentation Effectiveness, Managing Your Emotional Energy, and Legal Updates for Lodging, Restaurant and Club Operations.

Professor Barth earned his Law degree, Master of Arts in Communications, and a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors in Economics from Texas Tech University. In 1995 he was recognized by the City of Houston for his accomplishments as a faculty member at the University of Houston, and in 1996 he received the Dean’s Award for Teaching Excellence at the Conrad N. Hilton College, University of Houston. In 1998 Professor Barth was awarded the University Teaching Excellence Award, the highest recognition of teaching bestowed by the University of Houston. In 2000 he received the University of Houston’s Distance Education Award. In 2001 he launched HospitalityLawyer.com, and in 2002 he initiated the annual Hospitality Law Conference series. In 2003 Professor Barth created the Electronic Journal of Hospitality Legal, Safety, and Security Research. In 2007 he was the recipient of the Hilton College Outstanding Teacher award. In 2009, he received the Hilton College “HVS” Research Award. In 2011 he launched the Global Congress on Legal, Safety, and Security Solutions in Travel.

Mr. Barth can be contacted at 713-963-8800 or SBarth@HospitalityLawyer.com

Coming Up In The October Online Hotel Business Review


Feature Focus
Revenue Management: Measuring All Hotel Revenue Streams
Revenue Management is a dynamic and ever-evolving profession and its role is becoming increasingly influential within hotel operations. In some ways, the revenue manager's office is now the functional hub in a hotel. Primarily this is due to the fact that everything a revenue manager does affect every other department. Originally revenue managers based their forecasting and pricing strategies on a Revenue per Available Room (RevPAR) model and some traditional hotels still do. But other more innovative companies have recently adopted a Gross Operating Profit per Available Room (GOPPAR) model which measures performance across all hotel revenue streams. This metric considers revenue from all the profit centers in a hotel - restaurants, bars, spas, conference/groups, golf courses, gaming, etc. - in order to determine the real gross operating profit per room. By fully understanding and appreciating the profit margins in all these areas, as well as knowing the demand for each one during peak or slow periods, the revenue manager can forecast and price rooms more accurately, effectively and profitably. In addition, this information can be shared with general managers, sales managers, controllers, and owners so that they are all aware of and involved in forecasting and pricing strategies. One consequence of a revenue manager's increasing value in hotel operations is a current shortage of talent in this field. Some hotels are being forced to co-source or out-source this specialized function and in the meantime, some university administrators are looking more closely at developing a revenue management curriculum as a strategy for helping the hospitality industry close this gap. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these significant developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.