Mr. Callaghan

Chad Callaghan

Principal

Premises Liability Consultants

Chad Callaghan is the Principal for Premises Liability Consultants, a sole proprietorship that provides consulting services and litigation support to commercial facilities and law firms. He also serves as the Safety & Security Consultant to the American Hotel & Lodging Association. He is formerly the Vice-President of Global Safety & Security - Americas for Marriott International, having had responsibility for the safety and security for all Marriott businesses and brands in the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean. He has served the loss prevention profession for 37 years and Marriott International for 35 years.

Mr. Callaghan currently serves on the Board of Directors for ASIS International and is a member of the Council on Litigation Management and the CSO Roundtable. He was recently named to the Henley-Putnam University Strategic Security & Protection Management Program’s Advisory Board.

In the past, he has served as the Chair of the Lodging Sector for the Department of Homeland Security Commercial Facilities Coordinating Council, Co-Chair of the ASIS Guidelines and Standards Commission, Chairman of the American Hotel & Lodging Association Loss Prevention Committee and the Security Planning Councils for the Atlanta and Salt Lake Olympic Games.

Mr. Callaghan has been a Certified Protection Professional (CPP) since 1984, a Certified Lodging Security Director (CLSD) since 1999, and attained the Certified Security Consultant (CSC) designation in 2006. In 2001, Mr. Callaghan received the Raymond C. Ellis Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Hospitality Industry and, in 2002, received the Presidential Award of Merit, both from ASIS International. In 2007, he was recognized as one of the “Top 25 Most Influential People in the Security Industry” by Security Magazine. In 2008, Mr. Callaghan was awarded the “Lifetime Achievement Award” from Hospitality Lawyer.com.

Mr. Callaghan has authored several articles on safety and security in the lodging industry and contributed to the reference book Security Business Practices. Additionally, he currently serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for Corporate Security and Hospitality Law publications. He has been a guest lecturer at the University of Houston, Cornell University, Georgia State University and Delaware State University.

A native of Atlanta, Georgia, Mr. Callaghan received a BA degree in Communications from the University of South Florida in 1974 and did graduate work at Georgia State University. He has a wife and two sons and resides in Atlanta, Ga.

Mr. Callaghan can be contacted at 301-380-6894 or chad.callaghan@marriott.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.