Mr. Callaghan

Chad Callaghan

Principal

Premises Liability Consultants

Chad Callaghan is the Principal for Premises Liability Consultants, a sole proprietorship that provides consulting services and litigation support to commercial facilities and law firms. He also serves as the Safety & Security Consultant to the American Hotel & Lodging Association. He is formerly the Vice-President of Global Safety & Security - Americas for Marriott International, having had responsibility for the safety and security for all Marriott businesses and brands in the U.S., Latin America and the Caribbean. He has served the loss prevention profession for 37 years and Marriott International for 35 years.

Mr. Callaghan currently serves on the Board of Directors for ASIS International and is a member of the Council on Litigation Management and the CSO Roundtable. He was recently named to the Henley-Putnam University Strategic Security & Protection Management Program’s Advisory Board.

In the past, he has served as the Chair of the Lodging Sector for the Department of Homeland Security Commercial Facilities Coordinating Council, Co-Chair of the ASIS Guidelines and Standards Commission, Chairman of the American Hotel & Lodging Association Loss Prevention Committee and the Security Planning Councils for the Atlanta and Salt Lake Olympic Games.

Mr. Callaghan has been a Certified Protection Professional (CPP) since 1984, a Certified Lodging Security Director (CLSD) since 1999, and attained the Certified Security Consultant (CSC) designation in 2006. In 2001, Mr. Callaghan received the Raymond C. Ellis Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Hospitality Industry and, in 2002, received the Presidential Award of Merit, both from ASIS International. In 2007, he was recognized as one of the “Top 25 Most Influential People in the Security Industry” by Security Magazine. In 2008, Mr. Callaghan was awarded the “Lifetime Achievement Award” from Hospitality Lawyer.com.

Mr. Callaghan has authored several articles on safety and security in the lodging industry and contributed to the reference book Security Business Practices. Additionally, he currently serves on the Editorial Advisory Board for Corporate Security and Hospitality Law publications. He has been a guest lecturer at the University of Houston, Cornell University, Georgia State University and Delaware State University.

A native of Atlanta, Georgia, Mr. Callaghan received a BA degree in Communications from the University of South Florida in 1974 and did graduate work at Georgia State University. He has a wife and two sons and resides in Atlanta, Ga.

Mr. Callaghan can be contacted at 301-380-6894 or chad.callaghan@marriott.com

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.