Ms. Phillips

Molly Phillips

Manager of Corporate Social Responsibility

Pan Pacific Hotel Seattle

Molly Phillips began her career in hospitality as Concierge for Four Seasons Hotel Philadelphia. She was a founding member of the “Green Team” for the hotel and achieved many successes in this area for the hotel; starting a hotel-wide recycling and composting program and working with Engineering Dept. on energy saving initiatives. In 2006, the hotel was awarded “Recycler of the Year” by the Greater Philadelphia Commercial Recycling Council.

Ms. Phillips moved to Seattle and began working for Kimpton Hotel Group in 2007. After completing a degree in Sustainable Business, she was named Manager of Sustainable Partnerships for all three Seattle Kimpton hotels. She created a pilot program to set companywide standards and metrics for monitoring the hotel’s environmental footprint and represented the company on panels, roundtable discussions and press interviews. The pilot program was then adopted company-wide to provide footprint analysis for guest rooms and meetings.

Ms. Phillips joined Pan Pacific Hotel Seattle in 2010 as Manager of Corporate Social Responsibility. She created and is evolving the PanEarth Program to explore and improve upon all aspects of their environmental and social sustainability.

Ms. Phillips was born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA and graduated with a B.A. in Communications / Media from Indiana University of Pennsylvania. In 2008, she graduated from Bainbridge Graduate Institute with a degree in Sustainable Business.

Ms. Phillips can be contacted at 206-323-3733 or molly.phillips@panpacific.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.