Mr. O'Connor

Peter O'Connor

Academic Director

Institute de Management Hotelier Int.

Peter O'Connor is Academic Director and Professor of Information Systems at Institute de Management Hotelier International (IMHI), an MBA program specialising in international hospitality management administered by ESSEC Business School, France. He received his Doctorate in hospitality e-commerce from Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, holds a Master's degree in Management Information Systems from Trinity College, Dublin and a Bachelor of Science degree in Hotel and Catering Management from the Dublin Institute of Technology.

Dr. O’Connor’s primary research, teaching and consulting interests focus on the use of technology in the hospitality and tourism sectors. He has developed expertise on the use of electronic channels of distribution in tourism, and on how information technology can be used to enhance both the management and operational effectiveness of hospitality organizations.

Based on his work, he has authored two leading textbooks on technology in the hospitality business - "Using Computers in Hospitality" (Cassell, UK, 2000 - now in its fourth edition) and "Electronic Information Distribution in Hospitality and Tourism Industries" (CABI, UK, 1999), as well as numerous articles in both the trade and academic press. In addition he serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Hospitality Management, Information Technology & Tourism, the International Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology and The Cornell Hotel Administration Quarterly, and is an active member of organizations such as HITA (Hospitality Information Technology Association), HFTP (Hospitality Finance & Technology Professionals) and IFITT (the International Federation of Information Technology in Tourism). Recently he was awarded the prestigious Best Research Paper award at the 2002 ENTER Technology in Tourism conference by the International Federation for Information Technology in Tourism.

Dr. O’Connor has taught professional seminars on technology management for a variety of leading international hospitality companies, including Group Accor, Intercontinental Hotels & Resorts, Kempinski Hotels & Resorts, the British Tourist Board, the International Hotel & Restaurant Association, the European Commission and the World Tourism Organisation Business Council. He is also a regular speaker at academic and industry conferences on technology-related issues and trends. Prior to joining IMHI, Mr. O’Connor was a lecturer in hospitality computer applications at the Dublin Institute of Technology and an associate lecturer at the Michael Smurfit Graduate School of Business, University College Dublin. He has held a visiting position at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration and worked in a wide variety of positions in the international hospitality industry in sectors ranging from luxury hotels to contract food services.

Mr. O'Connor can be contacted at +33 1 3443 3177 or oconnor@essec.fr

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.