Mr. O'Connor

Peter O'Connor

Academic Director

Institute de Management Hotelier Int.

Peter O'Connor is Academic Director and Professor of Information Systems at Institute de Management Hotelier International (IMHI), an MBA program specialising in international hospitality management administered by ESSEC Business School, France. He received his Doctorate in hospitality e-commerce from Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, holds a Master's degree in Management Information Systems from Trinity College, Dublin and a Bachelor of Science degree in Hotel and Catering Management from the Dublin Institute of Technology.

Dr. O’Connor’s primary research, teaching and consulting interests focus on the use of technology in the hospitality and tourism sectors. He has developed expertise on the use of electronic channels of distribution in tourism, and on how information technology can be used to enhance both the management and operational effectiveness of hospitality organizations.

Based on his work, he has authored two leading textbooks on technology in the hospitality business - "Using Computers in Hospitality" (Cassell, UK, 2000 - now in its fourth edition) and "Electronic Information Distribution in Hospitality and Tourism Industries" (CABI, UK, 1999), as well as numerous articles in both the trade and academic press. In addition he serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Hospitality Management, Information Technology & Tourism, the International Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology and The Cornell Hotel Administration Quarterly, and is an active member of organizations such as HITA (Hospitality Information Technology Association), HFTP (Hospitality Finance & Technology Professionals) and IFITT (the International Federation of Information Technology in Tourism). Recently he was awarded the prestigious Best Research Paper award at the 2002 ENTER Technology in Tourism conference by the International Federation for Information Technology in Tourism.

Dr. O’Connor has taught professional seminars on technology management for a variety of leading international hospitality companies, including Group Accor, Intercontinental Hotels & Resorts, Kempinski Hotels & Resorts, the British Tourist Board, the International Hotel & Restaurant Association, the European Commission and the World Tourism Organisation Business Council. He is also a regular speaker at academic and industry conferences on technology-related issues and trends. Prior to joining IMHI, Mr. O’Connor was a lecturer in hospitality computer applications at the Dublin Institute of Technology and an associate lecturer at the Michael Smurfit Graduate School of Business, University College Dublin. He has held a visiting position at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration and worked in a wide variety of positions in the international hospitality industry in sectors ranging from luxury hotels to contract food services.

Mr. O'Connor can be contacted at +33 1 3443 3177 or oconnor@essec.fr

Coming Up In The June Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Sales & Marketing: Who Owns the Guest?
Hotels and OTAs are, by necessity, joined at the hip and locked in a symbiotic relationship that is uneasy at best. Hotels require the marketing presence that OTAs offer and of course, OTAs guest’s email when it sends guest information to a hotel, effectively allowing OTAs to maintain “ownership” of the guest. Without ready access to guest need hotel product to offer their online customers. But recently, several OTAs have decided to no longer share a data, hotels are severely constrained from marketing directly to a guest which allows them to capture repeat business – the lowest cost and highest value travelers. Hotels also require this data to effectively market to previous guests, so ownership of this data will be a significant factor as hotels and OTAs move forward. Another issue is the increasing shift to mobile travel bookings. Mobile will account for more than half of all online travel bookings next year, and 78.6% of them will use their smartphone to make those reservations. As a result, hotels must have a robust mobile marketing plan in place, which means responsive design, one-click booking, and location technology. Another important mobile marketing element is a “Click-to-Call” feature. According to a recent Google survey, 68% of hotel guests report that it is extremely/very important to be able to call a hotel during the purchase phase, and 58% are very likely to call a hotel if the capability is available in a smartphone search. The June Hotel Business Review will report on some of these issues and strategies, and examine how some sales and marketing professionals are integrating them into their operations.