Ms. Horwell

Vanessa Horwell

Founder & Chief Visibility Officer

ThinkInk & TravelInk'd

Vanessa Horwell is the founder and Chief Visibility Officer of ThinkInk & TravelInk’d, a public relations and visibility firm that shuns press releases in favor of storytelling. She has spent the past 18 years working with companies in the US, UK and Europe, developing successful campaigns and strategies for their brands. She founded ThinkInk in 2004, after being fed up with PR agencies that offered mediocre results for big fees.

Today, Ms. Horwell is a senior level strategist who works with companies in North America, EMEA and Asia-Pac in developing winning media campaigns, building relationships with influencers, and improving visibility through a unique style of public relations. She also has an entrepreneurial spirit that comes from having raised capital for start-ups, and having grown her own businesses.

Ms. Horwell is also recognized in the field of mobile marketing through her ongoing column in the mobile industry resource, Mobile Marketer, the Director of PR for the Heartland Mobile Council (HMC) in North America, and being named to the Mobile Women to Watch 2010 for her contributions to mobile advertising, marketing and media in 2010.

Whether she works in mobile, travel or technology, Ms. Horwell’s purpose is to help build reputations and relationships for the company’s clients – with media, potential customers and partners; to tell her clients’ stories to the world, and to make them visible where it counts most. She uses her almost two decades of industry insight to create PR campaigns with a purpose, creating awareness, instilling beliefs, changing behaviors and motivating actions that translate into support for ThinkInk’s clients.

Ms. Horwell can be contacted at 305-749-5342 or vanessa@thinkinkpr.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.