Mr. Butler

Jim Butler

Chairman

JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group

Jim Butler is the Chairman of JMBM’s Global Hospitality Group® and Chinese Investment Group™, the author of the Hotel Law Blog on HotelLawyer.com, and the Founder of Meet the Money® -- National Hotel Finance & Investment Conference.

Mr. Butler and his team of hotel lawyers represent hotel owners, developers and investors. The group has helped their clients find business and legal solutions for more than $68 billion of hotel transactions, involving more than 1,500 properties around the globe, providing the most extensive virtual database in the world of transactional market terms.

Mr. Butler devotes 100% of his law practice to hospitality and is recognized as one of the top hotel lawyers in the world. He and his team provide business and legal advice on virtually every kind of hospitality transaction or issue, including: ADA compliance & defense, construction, development, equity & joint ventures, financing, foreign investment, franchise & licensing, hotel-specific contracts, labor & employment including union issues, land use & environmental, leasing, litigation, management agreements, purchase & sale, tax, trademark & copyright, vacation ownership, condo hotels and workouts, bankruptcies and receiverships.

Mr. Butler and the hotel lawyers with JMBM's Global Hospitality Group® are aggressive, passionate advocates for owners, developers and investors. Because they do not represent any of the traditional hotel brands or branded management companies, they are conflict-free in helping their clients to level the playing field. More than "just" great hotel lawyers, JMBM's Global Hospitality Group are deal makers. They can help find the right operator or capital provider. They help clients identify key business goals, assemble the right team, strategize the approach to optimize value and then get the deal done.

Mr. Butler is frequently quoted as an expert on hotel issues by publications such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, BusinessWeek, Thomson Reuters and Bloomberg News. You can get his perspective on the Hotel Law Blog; his books are available on HotelLawyer.com.

Mr. Butler can be contacted at 310-201-3526 or jbutler@jmbm.com

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.