Mr. Gallagher

Bram Gallagher

Economist

CBRE Hotels' Americas Research

Bram Gallagher is an Economist for CBRE Hotelsí Americas Research, the Americas research arm of the worldís largest commercial real estate firm. He maintains performance forecasting models for 60 major U.S. hotel markets, performs consulting work for a destination marketing organization, creates tools for hotel developers, and examines the effects natural disasters have on hotel occupancy. His background in statistical modeling and understanding of how markets operate have allowed him to reveal powerful, new insight into the future of the lodging industry.

After earning his PhD in Economics with a focus in Econometrics from the University of Georgia in 2011, Mr. Gallagher worked as a professor at Middle Tennessee State University and Berry College. Taking his expertise in microeconomic and econometric theory with him, he left the academy for a research position in the lodging industry in 2015 to better learn how economics is practiced. His research interests are in analyzing hotel performance data combined with local and national economic data to produce actionable intelligence for the hotel manager, investor and developer. He believes that reducing and characterizing uncertainty around future outcomes spurs present decisions.

Mr. Gallagher has presented his findings on occupancy taxes to AAHOA, a paper on natural occupancy and rental adjustment at the conference of the American Real Estate Society, and thoughts on novel forecasting methods to his colleagues. He has had his research published in several CBRE reports, as well as in Hotel News Now. He has also published a generalization of the Arrow-Lind Theorem in the Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research.

Please visit http://www.cbre.com for more information.

Mr. Gallagher can be contacted at 404-812-5189 or bram.gallagher@cbre.com

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotelís operation that isnít touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law Ė real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott Internationalís acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important Ė the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding itís much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.