Ms. Sher

Circe Sher

Co-Founder

Piazza Hospitality

With more than two decadesí experience in public relations and marketing across many platforms and a lifetime in a real estate and restaurant family, Circe Sher brings broad expertise to her position as co-founder of Piazza Hospitality.

Since the companyís formation in 2001, she has overseen the marketing, public relations and promotional efforts for its properties including Hotel Healdsburg and its sister property h2hotel, as well as its associated restaurants Spoonbar, Pizzando and Charlie Palmerís Dry Creek Kitchen.

Beyond marketing the final product, Ms. Sher also helps direct the conceptual development of Piazza Hospitalityís contemporary properties. She played a pivotal role in creating the concept of the boutique luxury Hotel Healdsburg and the eco-friendly, avant-garde h2hotel, along with the concept for The Spa at Hotel Healdsburg. Her energies are now focused on three new projects: a third property in Healdsburg, the H3 GuestHouse; Hotel San Luis Obispo on the Central Coast; and a recently approved hotel project in Sebastopol. The forthcoming boutique hotels will serve as environmentally-friendly chic retreats, inviting visitors to relax, recharge and play.

Prior to her career in the hospitality business, Ms. Sher was an officer for Mayor Willie Brown of San Francisco in the Mayorís Office of Protocol through 2001. During this time, she was in charge of planning and fundraising for large city events and international trade missions, and served as his liaison to the arts community and international consular corps.

Ms. Sher graduated from UC Berkeley with a Bachelor of Arts in cultural anthropology in 1991. She has a five-year-old daughter and lives in Healdsburg.

Please visit http://www.piazzahospitality.com for more information.

Ms. Sher can be contacted at 707-431-8221 or info@piazzahospitality.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining Ė all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. Itís leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. Itís the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.