Ms. Bravo-Smith

Manuela Bravo-Smith

Senior Designer - Hospitality

Carrier Johnson + Culture

From a very young age, as early as five or six-years-old, Manuela Bravo-Smith knew she wanted to become an architect. Born in Mexico City and raised in Guadalajara, Mexico, Ms. Bravo-Smith has experienced the tangible and visual contrast between communities through time. Through travel and contact with various cultures, she has had the opportunity to reflect on how others see and experience new places. She has been influenced by her parentís background: her motherís simple and calm farm lifestyle, and her fatherís demanding career as a civil engineer in what was the biggest city in the world at the time.

After completing a five-year architectural degree program from the Guadalajara Universityís CUAAD (University Center of Art, Architecture and Design) in 1997, Ms. Bravo-Smith began her professional journey from working at job sites to a project management position at an international engineering company, and finally to her current position with Carrier Johnson + CULTURE.

The journey also led her to leave her native Mexico for Monterey in 2002, and then to San Diego in 2004. Working with well-established and respected architectural firms, Ms. Bravo-Smith has been exposed to a variety of domestic and international projects, ranging in building type from hospitality and mixed-use residential to corporate. While maintaining her architectural background she segued into the interior design field, and has been focused primarily on the hospitality sector since 2009.

Working on four- and five-star hotel projects, Ms. Bravo-Smith works to elicit a unique personality for each project, rooting the design of each in the regional environment and historical context.

Please visit http://www.carrierjohnson.com for more information.

Ms. Bravo-Smith can be contacted at 619-239-2353 or web@carrierjohnson.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, itís that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort Ė one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms Ė they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.