Mr. Rosenberg

Charles B. Rosenberg

Attorney

White & Case LLP

Charles (Chip) B. Rosenberg is an attorney in the Washington, DC office of White & Case LLP, where he represents private parties and foreign governments in complex international arbitrations. He has experience representing clients in disputes at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), as well as under the arbitration rules of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL).

Mr. Rosenberg is an adjunct professor at the American University Washington College of Law, where he teaches an International Investment Law & Policy seminar. He also is the Executive Editor of the World Arbitration & Mediation Review.

Prior to joining White & Case LLP, M. Rosenberg spent two years in The Hague, Netherlands clerking for The Honorable Charles N. Brower, who at the time was ranked the “world’s busiest arbitrator” by The American Lawyer in terms of large international arbitrations. While clerking, he taught an advanced seminar on International Investment Dispute Settlement at The Hague University of Applied Sciences.

Mr. Rosenberg graduated first in his class, summa cum laude, and Order of the Coif from the American University Washington College of Law.

Please visit http://www.whitecase.com for more information.

Mr. Rosenberg can be contacted at 202-729-2324 or charles.rosenberg@whitecase.com

Coming Up In The May Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Eco-Friendly Practices: The Value of Sustainability
The hotel industry continues to make remarkable progress in implementing sustainability policies and procedures in their properties throughout the world. As a result, they continue to reap the benefits of increased profitability, enhanced guest experiences, and improved community relations. In addition, as industry standards are codified and adopted worldwide, hotels can now compare how their operations measure up against their competitors in terms of sustainable practices and accomplishments. This capacity to publicly compare and contrast is spurring competition and driving innovation as hotels do not wish to be left behind in this area. Water management and conservation is still a primary issue as population growth, urbanization, pollution and wasteful consumption patterns place increasing demands on freshwater supply. Water recycling; installing low-flow fixtures; using digital sensors to control water usage; and even harvesting rainwater are just a few things that some hotels are doing to preserve this precious resource. Waste management is another major concern. Through policies of reduce, reuse and recycle, some hotels are implementing “zero-waste” programs with the goal of substantially reducing their landfill waste which produces carbon dioxide and methane gases. Other hotels have established comprehensive training programs that reinforce the value of sustainability. There is employee engagement through posters and quizzes, and even contests are held to increase innovation, sensitivity and environmental awareness. Some hotels are also monitoring a guest’s energy usage and rewarding those who consumed less energy with gifts and incentives. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document how some hotels are integrating eco-friendly practices into their operations and how they and the environment are benefiting from them.