Mr. Meek

Frank Meek

International Technical & Training Director

Orkin, LLC

“Knowledge is power when it comes to effective pest management.”

An industry veteran, Frank Meek has been with Orkin since 1986. In 2003, he was named among the future leaders of the pest management industry in Pest Control Technology magazine’s “40 Under 40” ranking. Currently, as the International Technical and Training Director, Mr. Meek provides technical support and training in both sales and service to Orkin's international franchises, helping them grow and develop in their specific markets. As a board-certified entomologist, Mr. Meek teaches Integrated Pest Management principles and can explain how to use all available methodologies to prevent pest infestations in various commercial settings.

Mr. Meek has experience in all areas of pest control, enabling him to provide a cross-industry overview of the role that pest management can play in improved safety and sanitation. His common-sense approach and extensive experience make him a natural media resource. Among other pest management topics, he is well versed in best pest management practices in hospitality environments.

Mr. Meek is a regular speaker at National Pest Management Association (NPMA) and many international, state and regional pest control association meetings, as well as non pest control industry associations such as the American Society for Healthcare Environmental Services (ASHES). He has published many articles for the pest control industry trade magazines, as well as major media outlets such as Wall Street Journal, New York Times, CNN, MSNBC and others. Meek has also represented Orkin on national television with appearances on shows such as the NBC Today Show, CNN and ABC News.

Mr. Meek writes a monthly column called “Technicalities” for PMP magazine. In 2005, he co-authored the IPM Recommended Practice book for American Society for Healthcare Environmental Services (ASHES), which has become the standard for providing pest management service to the healthcare industry. In 2010, Mr. Meek authored the chapter on Occasional Invader Pest in the 10th edition of the Mallis Handbook to Pest Control Operations.

Previously, Mr. Meek has contributed to HotelExecutive.com on topics ranging from pest management practices for LEED certification to bed bugs and integrating pest management into redesign plans.

Mr. Meek can be contacted at 404-888-2898 or fmeek@rollinscorp.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.