Mr. Fistrovich

George Fistrovich

Executive Chef

The Ritz Carlton Naples, Southwest Florida

Chef Fistrovich leads more than 100 culinary professionals and oversees all food and beverage operations and culinary services for the ten dining experiences and group banquets at The Ritz-Carlton, Naples and The Ritz-Carlton Golf Resort, Naples, both located on Southwest Florida’s Paradise Coast. In recognition of his outstanding accomplishments and culinary passion, Chef Fistrovich was honored by The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company in 2012 with the Award for Culinary Excellence and named Chef of the Year for the Americas.

Chef Fistrovich has more than 21 years of culinary experience, and most recently served as executive chef at The Ritz-Carlton, Key Biscayne where he directed the resort’s three full-service restaurants, exclusive Rum Bar and more than 80 culinary professionals.

His additional experiences in the culinary arts come from his role as executive chef for a number of leading hotels and restaurants from around the world, including The Kerry Centre (Beijing); Harrods (London); The Royal Towers at Atlantis (Paradise Island, Bahamas); The Marina-Mandarin Hotel (Singapore); and The Hayman Island Resort (Great Barrier Reef, Australia).

Chef Fistrovich has also completed a number of advanced culinary learning extensions in venues throughout France, Singapore, London, China, Australia, the Bahamas and Washington, D.C.—as well as core training experiences in the kitchens of New York City’s famed Tavern on the Green, Chicago’s L’Escargot on Michigan, and the renowned Jean-Louis at Watergate in Washington, D.C.

After studying at Chicago’s Washburne Culinary Institute, Chef Fistrovich expanded his education to include advanced curricula at the Culinary Institute of America, International Pastry Arts Center, and Carma Ltd. in Dübendorf, Germany.

Mr. Fistrovich can be contacted at

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.