Mr. Cerrone

Bob Cerrone

Director of National Accounts - Hospitality

Ferguson

Bob Cerrone, Fergusonís Director of National Accounts Ė Hospitality, is responsible for leading Fergusonís Hospitality strategy and discovering and implementing new opportunities within the segment.

Mr. Cerrone, a nearly 40-year veteran of the plumbing industry, launched Fergusonís Hospitality division in 2006. Under his leadership, Ferguson Hospitality has grown into a talented group of more than 100 associates comprised of national account managers and the Hospitality Renovations Team.

Fergusonís Hospitality Renovations Team understands the needs of the specialty contractors that operate in the Hospitality Renovations market and how they do business. They provide product expertise to contractors, owners, hotel brands and purchasing groups on a large bundle of products and facilitate on-time delivery for renovation projects, typically working on compressed schedules.

Fergusonís Hospitality division serves many different customer segments: ownership groups, management companies, renovation contractors, purchasing companies, and independent and branded hotels throughout the U.S. Their product inventory addresses a broad range of hospitality needs: plumbing, lighting, appliances, HVAC, janitorial and sanitation supplies.

Additional support services include: a National Sales Center which is staffed by a highly experienced team of associates with deep knowledge of Fergusonís hospitality products and a 24/7 Express Response Commercial Water Heater Program which delivers hot water heaters onsite, directly to the location of installation within about two hours of a service call.

Mr. Cerrone can be contacted at 954-520-5965 or bob.cerrone@ferguson.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, itís that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort Ė one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms Ė they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.