Mr. King

Tim King

Design Director

Luxlo

Tim King is the principal designer for Luxlo, a luxury London-based residential developer, which is now making its first foray into Beverly Hills. Mr. King has collaborated with some of most iconic innovators and trendsetters in the hospitality and lifestyle space and recently completed a total redesign of Mosaic Hotel.

Through his diverse experience in all aspects of architecture, design, space planning and project management, Mr. King has developed the distinct daring style he is best known for today—bold interiors that strike a playful balance between the classic and the contemporary. Born and raised in West London, Mr. King's family was always involved in real estate, hence his early inspiration. He attended boarding school, where he received a well-rounded education. During summers and holidays, he traveled extensively with his family, taking in arts & architectural experiences from around the world.

Inspired by his travels, Mr. King went on to study interior architecture at Brighton University before securing a job with Northacre, a high-end development firm in London. During this time, he worked on prestigious projects from large residential homes to several projects in Dubai, a palace in Riyadh and a 55-meter Super yacht built in Holland. After 12 years, Mr. King took his current position for Luxlo, where he has now served as the design director for five years. Among Luxlo’s most notable achievements are 77 MAYFAIR, an iconic residential development in Central London, which has achieved record prices and the recent redesign of Mosaic Hotel in Los Angeles.

Please visit www.l-design.com for more information.

Mr. King can be contacted at + 44 2036644035 or tim@luxlo.co.uk

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.