Mr. King

Tim King

Design Director

Luxlo

Tim King is the principal designer for Luxlo, a luxury London-based residential developer, which is now making its first foray into Beverly Hills. Mr. King has collaborated with some of most iconic innovators and trendsetters in the hospitality and lifestyle space and recently completed a total redesign of Mosaic Hotel.

Through his diverse experience in all aspects of architecture, design, space planning and project management, Mr. King has developed the distinct daring style he is best known for today—bold interiors that strike a playful balance between the classic and the contemporary. Born and raised in West London, Mr. King's family was always involved in real estate, hence his early inspiration. He attended boarding school, where he received a well-rounded education. During summers and holidays, he traveled extensively with his family, taking in arts & architectural experiences from around the world.

Inspired by his travels, Mr. King went on to study interior architecture at Brighton University before securing a job with Northacre, a high-end development firm in London. During this time, he worked on prestigious projects from large residential homes to several projects in Dubai, a palace in Riyadh and a 55-meter Super yacht built in Holland. After 12 years, Mr. King took his current position for Luxlo, where he has now served as the design director for five years. Among Luxlo’s most notable achievements are 77 MAYFAIR, an iconic residential development in Central London, which has achieved record prices and the recent redesign of Mosaic Hotel in Los Angeles.

Please visit www.l-design.com for more information.

Mr. King can be contacted at + 44 2036644035 or tim@luxlo.co.uk

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.