Mr. Brown

Banks Brown

Partner

McDermott Will & Emery LLP

Banks Brown is a partner in the New York office of McDermott Will & Emery. He has served as outside General Counsel for the American Hotel & Lodging Association and the Hotel Association of New York City, Inc. for 22 years. He helped to found the Travel Business Roundtable and served as its General Counsel until it was merged into the US Travel Association. He is co-author of a recognized treatise on hospitality law entitled “Understanding Hospitality Law” (4th Ed. Educational Institute, AHLA). He is the 2006 recipient of the Anthony G. Marshall Award for Pioneering and Continuous Contribution to Hospitality Law and the 2010 Distinguished Service Award of the Academy of Hospitality Industry Attorneys. He speaks yearly at the Hospitality Law Conference of HospitalityLawyer.com, where he hosts the hotel inside counsel segment.

Early in his career, Mr. Brown represented the American Stock Exchange in shareholder actions under Section 6 of the Securities Exchange Act, numerous consumer class actions under the now-defunct Department of Energy price controls on oil and gas, and a decade-long series of class actions arising out of Gulf Oil Corporation's tender offer for the stock of Cities Service Corporation. He continues to represent parties involved in complex litigation. As a result of his extensive litigation experience, Mr. Brown has a deep working knowledge of cost, fee and risk analysis.

Mr. Brown was admitted New York State Bar in 1978. He was graduated from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1977 and Harvard College (cum laude) in 1974.

Mr. Brown can be contacted at 212-547-5361 or bbrown@mwe.com

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.