Mr. Foliot

David Foliot

Vice President, Hospitality

Foliot Furniture

Based in Las Vegas, Nevada, David Foliot is vice president of the hospitality division of Foliot Furniture. His interest in the company initially sparked at the tender age of eight, when he accompanied his father to meetings with clients and suppliers. When he was old enough to begin working, his choice of workplace was obvious. He spent the next six summers working in the factory while quickly rising through the ranks. Majoring in Management at the University of Quebec in Montreal further prepared him for a future with Foliot Furniture.

Throughout his career, Mr. Foliot has made it a point to touch every aspect of the company, be it in sales, planning, or on the road as a sales representative. His experience with multiple facets of the company has not only made him an invaluable asset but has also ensured that his expertise is well rounded.

During his tenure with the hospitality division, Mr. Foliot recognized the opportunity for Foliot Furniture to grow within the hotel industry. He helped pioneer the use of laminates for furniture in major hotel chains, including Holiday Inn and Hiltonís Hampton Hotels.

While building a team of dedicated and competent employees, establishing a strategic sales plan, and investing countless hours in research and development, he has been instrumental in driving growth and increasing sales. As Foliot Furniture continues to position itself as the premier manufacturer and vendor of laminate furniture in the hospitality industry, Mr. Foliot is more focused than ever on building upon past successes while expanding to additional hotel chains.

Mr. Foliot can be contacted at 702-277-4365 or david@foliot.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, itís that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort Ė one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms Ė they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.