• Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Pan Pacific Hotel Seattle Introduces PanEarth Initiative

  • The Pacific Northwest region has always been at the forefront of the green revolution, and at Pan Pacific Hotel Seattle, we felt it made good business sense to offer sustainable services and options that were in line with our customers’ wants and needs. Since opening in 2006, the team at Pan Pacific Hotel Seattle has put a significant focus on being globally responsible and on collaborating with our local community. In 2010, we made a mindful decision to implement a property-wide sustainability program called PanEarth.

    The PanEarth program incorporates all aspects of community and environment into corporate decision-making and honors of the triple bottom line: people, planet, profit. The triple bottom line is a set of values and criteria for measuring organizational and societal success based on economic, ecological and social impact. While other hotels often adopt environmentally friendly practices as cost saving initiatives, Pan Pacific implemented the PanEarth program because we truly value sustainable practices and believe that our customers know the difference. After an initial cost benefit analysis, our leadership team concluded that it made business sense to invest in a wide variety of initiatives and we have already seen direct returns from our initial investments. For ...


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Hotel Business Review Eco-Friendly Practices

Mark  Sisson
Jeff Slye
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Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review

Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Original, Authentic and Localized
Corporate hotel developers once believed that their customers appreciated a homogenous design experience; that regardless of their physical location, they would be reassured and comforted by a similar look, feel and design in all their brand properties. Inevitably this led to a sense of impersonality, predictability and boredom in their guests who ultimately rejected this notion. Today's hotel customer is expecting an experience that is far more original and authentic - an experience that features a design aesthetic that is more location-oriented, inspired by local cultures, attractions, food and art. Architects and designers are investing more time to engage the local culture, and to integrate the unique qualities of each location into their hotel design. Expression of this design principle can take many shapes and forms. One trend is the adaptive reuse of existing facilities - from factories to office buildings - as a strategic way to preserve and affirm local culture. Many of these projects are not necessarily conversions of historic properties into grand, five-star landmark hotels, but rather a complete transformation of historic structures into mixed-use, residential, and hotel projects that take full advantage of their existing location. Another trend is the addition of local art into a hotel's design scheme. From small sculptures and photography to large-scale installations, integrating local art is an effective means to elevate and enhance a guest's perception and experience of the hotel. These are just a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.