SUBSCRIBER CONTENT PREVIEW
FOR FULL SITE ACCESS SUBSCRIBE NOW or PURCHASE PDF ARTICLE
  • Finance & Investment
  • Due Diligence Procedures for Hotel Appraisals

  • What is the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the phrase "business valuation"? Mathematics? Formulas perhaps? Maybe even WACC (weighted average cost of capital) for those of you with a MBA. The end product of an appraisal is often a numerical value and people sometimes perceive the process to be math intensive. Although it is true that the use of formulas and equations is essential to the valuation procedure, due diligence procedures encompass far more than mathematical models. The importance of due diligence research cannot be overlooked because of its crucial role in justifying the outcome of a valuation.

    There are many factors that directly influence the value of a subject business or hotel, and they can generally be classified under the following three main areas contributing to value: company environment, industry dynamics and economic conditions. These factors then form different aspects of due diligence research. In the following paragraphs, we will discuss the three areas of due diligence research in more detail.

    Company research encompasses several different factors, and in most cases, these have the most direct impact on a company's day-to-day operations. Some examples of company research are customer demographics, management/directorship structure, suppliers, advertising and intellectual property. ...

  • TO CONTINUE READING SUBSCRIBE NOW or PURCHASE PDF ARTICLE

Already a Subscriber?

Login
Email:
Password: Forgot password?
Remember me on this computer

Who Subscribes?

"The Hotel Business Review articles are a terrific source for current hotel industry information and trends".


Donald Trump Jr., Executive VP of Development
Trump Hotel Collection

Hotel Business Review Finance & Investment

Christopher G. Hurn
Mike Handelsman
Nitin Shah
Bob Carr
Mike Handelsman
Bob Carr
Coming Up In The October Online Hotel Business Review


Feature Focus
Revenue Management: Measuring All Hotel Revenue Streams
Revenue Management is a dynamic and ever-evolving profession and its role is becoming increasingly influential within hotel operations. In some ways, the revenue manager's office is now the functional hub in a hotel. Primarily this is due to the fact that everything a revenue manager does affect every other department. Originally revenue managers based their forecasting and pricing strategies on a Revenue per Available Room (RevPAR) model and some traditional hotels still do. But other more innovative companies have recently adopted a Gross Operating Profit per Available Room (GOPPAR) model which measures performance across all hotel revenue streams. This metric considers revenue from all the profit centers in a hotel - restaurants, bars, spas, conference/groups, golf courses, gaming, etc. - in order to determine the real gross operating profit per room. By fully understanding and appreciating the profit margins in all these areas, as well as knowing the demand for each one during peak or slow periods, the revenue manager can forecast and price rooms more accurately, effectively and profitably. In addition, this information can be shared with general managers, sales managers, controllers, and owners so that they are all aware of and involved in forecasting and pricing strategies. One consequence of a revenue manager's increasing value in hotel operations is a current shortage of talent in this field. Some hotels are being forced to co-source or out-source this specialized function and in the meantime, some university administrators are looking more closely at developing a revenue management curriculum as a strategy for helping the hospitality industry close this gap. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address these significant developments and document how some leading hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.