New Products & Services

New Restaurant and Bar Concept Arrives at the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel

Named after the Architect of the Gateway Arch, Eero's Reflects St. Louis Culture Both On and Off the Plate

ST. LOUIS, MO. July 20, 2017 - To get an authentic experience of St. Louis, travelers only have to arrive at the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel. Here, the city’s history and traditions infuse everything, from the recently renovated event space to the hotel’s community engagement. The most tantalizing example, however, may just be its newest restaurant: Eero’s, which specializes in contemporary American cuisine with a decidedly Midwestern twist.

Formerly known as Norah’s Crafted Food & Spirits, Eero’s owes its new nomenclature to Eero Saarinen, the early 20th-century Finnish-American architect. Saarinen was the visionary behind St. Louis’ Gateway Arch as well as other notable structures like the Washington Dulles International Airport.

As a name, Eero’s is particularly apt: The design of this restaurant near the St. Louis Airport incorporates nods to the city’s biggest traditions, including the soulfulness of the Blues, the camaraderie of the regional breweries and the innovation of the aerospace industry.

As a result, guests find themselves engaged with the restaurant before they even look at a menu. This is a place that invites you to pull up a seat and strike up a conversation. It’s the kind of place where you can make new friends or reconnect with old ones, learn something new and soak up that legendary Midwestern friendliness.

Of course, visitors may need to take a break from socializing once the food arrives. Further distinguishing itself among restaurants near Lambert Airport, Eero’s showcases local ingredients within its often hearty and always savory dishes. Guests can sit down to a St. Louis pork steak or crawfish au gratin if they crave stick-to-your-ribs fare. Or they can try a roasted-beet kale salad if they’re in the mood for something lighter. Whatever one orders, each dish offers a taste of the area’s culinary traditions – and ingredients – that leaves everyone hungry for more.

Complementing the menu is a selection of indulgent desserts (think salted-caramel bread pudding) as well as locally sourced craft beers that are available on tap. Breweries like 2nd Shift Brewing, Broadway Brewery, 4 Hands Brewing and others enjoy pride of place on the menu.

Guests can also order a flight of beers for the sort of edification that pairs well with dinner, or they can opt for something stronger: Eero’s offers a wide range of regional whiskeys. Also on the menu is specialty coffee by the St. Louis company, Kaldi’s, and an international wine list.

True to its Midwestern sensibilities, Eero’s doesn’t just stop at a mouthwatering menu. It also creates a sense of place through curated events. Guests can try one of the daily punch rituals made with local spirits, grab a table during one of the weekly performances by local musicians or drop in during a monthly meet-and-greet with the local art community. Like its menu and ambience, the events at Eero’s invite visitors to sit back and simply enjoy.

About the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel

At the Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel, visitors encounter a unique blend of contemporary luxury and Midwestern hospitality. Convenience informs much of one’s stay, from the complimentary shuttle service to and from the St. Louis airport, which is located just a mile away, to the high-speed Wi-Fi, on-site parking, fitness center and indoor and seasonal outdoor pools. Luxury, meanwhile, appears in the details of this St. Louis, Missouri hotel, which features pillow-top mattresses, flat-screen televisions, ergonomic desks and a Club Lounge. Indulgence also awaits at Eero’s, where local ingredients are transformed into tempting, modern American dishes. Additionally, the hotel offers more than 37,000 square feet of recently renovated event space for meetings and occasions that are as unforgettable as the rest of one’s stay.

Media Contact:
Renaissance St. Louis Airport Hotel
9801 Natural Bridge Road
St. Louis, Missouri 63134
314-429-1100
www.marriott.com/stlsa

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.