Business & Finance

CAFFLUENCE: Where a Western Cattle Drive is Lassoed with Five-Star Luxury

Only at The Broadmoor in Colorado Catt-Drive

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO. April 10, 2017 - Move along little prose. There is a new word, adventure, and experience in the world of travel, and it’s not Galantine’s Day, Glamping, Staycation or Babymoon.

It’s where real women and men (mostly from “town” or “the city”) come face-to-face with cows, a horse, and join in that all-American journey called a cattle drive. But this is not a scene from the great movie City Slickers, this is the legendary Broadmoor’s version of a cattle drive, where luxury prevails and where “The West” begins.

This is caffluence.

Call it what you will, the Five Star, Five Diamond Broadmoor resort will begin offering new day-long cattle drive experiences this summer roped into a world of luxury and affluence.

These authentic excursions on the 3,200-acre Elk Glade Ranch in the high country of Colorado give guests a unique insight and fun hands-on experience into wrangling large herds of cattle. Guests play “hide and seek” to first find the cattle, who move freely about on the open range, then drive them onto their summer or winter pastures near the slopes of Pikes Peak – the peak that inspired Katharine Lee Bates to pen “America the Beautiful.”

How much more American can you get?

Tired but invigorated guests return to the grandeur and hospitality of The Broadmoor, where sore muscles can be soothed in the Five-Star spa and bellies can be filled with delicacies from one of the resort’s ten award-winning restaurants.

Hey, you can even order a steak at La Taverne, The Broadmoor’s legendary steak house. You’ll have earned it.

Digital images and interviews are available upon request.

Contact:
Sally Spaulding
Percepture
sspaulding@percepture.com
970-986-9063

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review




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