Business & Finance

Outrigger Hotels and Resorts Transitions W. David P. Carey III to Advisory Board, KSL Resorts Co-Founder and CEO Scott Dalecio to Assume Daily Oversight

WAIKIKI, HONOLULU, HI. February 28, 2017 – Outrigger Hotels and Resorts announced today that W. David P. Carey III, who has successfully led the company for more than 30 years, will transition into a lead role on the Outrigger advisory board and focus on development, community relations and strategic growth. KSL Resorts co-founder and CEO Scott Dalecio will take over day-to-day oversight as Outrigger plans for future enhancements.

Additional appointments include the promotion of Outrigger veteran John Neeley, vice president of information technology, who has worked with Outrigger for 24 years and David Nadeau as incoming chief financial officer, a position in which he has served for more than two decades. Neeley and Nadeau will play integral roles in alignment of technology and innovation with Outrigger’s current assets and expansion plans.

“Outrigger is poised to enter its next phase of reinvestment and growth because of the solid foundation built by David Carey and his team; we’re grateful that he will continue to contribute his knowledge and expertise as a member of our board,” said Dalecio. “From Waikiki to the Maldives, we are excited to invest in the future of Outrigger; by infusing additional support and resources at our properties, hosts will have the tools to perform at the highest level and further elevate the Outrigger guest experience.”

“I am confident that the new team will lead Outrigger to new heights into the future and look forward to helping the company maintain its strong position in the community,” said Carey.

The company expects to reinvest upwards of $100 million over the next few years to improve its hotels and resorts. It will also add both resources and expertise for business development and project management. Along with the planned capital improvements, major technology upgrades and a renewed focus on host training and support will further strengthen the long-term sustainability of the company and additional opportunities for employees.

Dalecio has worked in the hospitality industry, including Hawaii, for over three decades. As a hospitality leader, he has been responsible for operating some of the most iconic hotels, resorts and clubs in the industry.

Outrigger will retain its headquarters in Waikiki, Hawaii and continue providing guests with its signature Ke ‘Ano Wa‘a (The Outrigger Way) hospitality throughout its portfolio.

About Outrigger Hotels and Resorts

Outrigger Enterprises Group is a privately held leisure lodging, retail and hospitality company with corporate offices in Hawaii and operating globally in the Asia-Pacific, Oceania and Indian Ocean regions. Guided by 69 years of family leadership, Outrigger runs a highly successful, multi-branded portfolio of hotels, condominiums and vacation resort properties. Outrigger currently operates and/or has under development 37 properties with approximately 6,500 rooms located in Hawaii (Oahu, Maui, Kauai, Hawaii Island); Guam; Fiji; Thailand; Mauritius; and the Maldives.

Contact:
Monica Salter
public.relations@outrigger.com
+1 808 921 6839

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Hotel Group Meetings: Blue Skies Ahead
After a decade of sacrifice and struggle, it seems that hotels and meeting planners have every reason to be optimistic about the group meeting business going forward. By every industry benchmark and measure, 2017 is shaping up to be a record year, which means more meetings in more locations for more attendees. And though no one in the industry is complaining about this rosy outlook, the strong demand is increasing competition among meeting planners across the board – for the most desirable locations, for the best hotels, for the most creative experiences, for the most talented chefs, and for the best technology available. Because of this robust demand, hotels are in the driver’s seat and they are flexing their collective muscles. Even though over 100,000 new rooms were added last year, hotel rates are expected to rise by a minimum of 4.0%, and they are also charging fees on amenities that were often gratis in the past. In addition, hotels are offering shorter lead times on booking commitments, forcing planners to sign contracts earlier than in past years. Planners are having to work more quickly and to commit farther in advance to secure key properties. Planners are also having to meet increased attendee expectations. They no longer are content with a trade show and a few dinners; they want an experience. Planners need to find ways to create a meaningful experience to ensure that attendees walk away with an impactful memory. This kind of experiential learning can generate a deeper emotional connection, which can ultimately result in increased brand recognition, client retention, and incremental sales. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group business and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.