Business & Finance

Hilton Chicago O'Hare Airport Employee Wins Hotelier of the Year Award

CHICAGO, IL. January 9, 2017 – At its annual Stars of the Industry statewide awards luncheon on December 15th, the Illinois Hotel & Lodging Association (IHLA) honored the best of Illinois' 35,000 hospitality workers and organizations, and one of the Hilton Chicago O’Hare Airport employees came out on top.

Mike McGilligan received the Illinois Hotelier of the Year Award. McGilligan has been with Hilton for 22 years, and 16 of those years have been spent as a Director of Sales & Marketing or General Manager. During those 16 years, he has promoted 41 managers from within to Executive Committee positions, 36 of whom are still with Hilton.

McGilligan truly enjoys teaching and mentoring junior managers, as well as taking time with high school and college students earning their hospitality degree. During his 16 years in a senior leadership role, McGilligan worked with several team members who are now General Managers, four who have been promoted to National Sales, and six who are now Directors of Sales & Marketing.

McGilligan also supports community involvement and giving back to others. He supports the Hilton O’Hare Blue Energy Committee which works to raise funds and be a resource for those in need in the community. McGilligan’s generosity and mentorship make him an exceptional leader and star.

The Illinois Hotel & Lodging Association comprises more than 500 hotels throughout the state of Illinois. The Association represents hotels, motels, and other lodging facilities that employ thousands of associates throughout the state. IHLA member hotels provide good-paying jobs with great benefits to their associates, and IHLA has several programs to help recognize the contributions of those employees and to provide them with training programs to assist in their career advancement opportunities.

Coming Up In The April Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Guest Service: The Personalized Experience
In the not-too-distant future, when guests arrive at a hotel, they will check themselves in using a kiosk in the lobby, by- passing a stop at the front desk. When they call room service to order food, it will be from a hotel mobile tablet, practically eliminating any contact with friendly service people. Though these inevitable developments will likely result in delivered to their door by a robot. When they visit a restaurant, their orders will be placed and the bill will be paid some staff reduction, there is a silver lining – all the remaining hotel staff can be laser-focused on providing guests with the best possible service available. And for most guests, that means being the beneficiary of a personalized experience from the hotel. According to a recent Yahoo survey, 78 percent of hotel guests expressed a desire for some kind of personalization. They are seeking services that not only make them feel welcomed, but valued, and cause them to feel good about themselves. Hotels must strive to establish an emotional bond with their guests, the kind of bond that creates guest loyalty and brings them back time and again. But providing personalized service is more than knowing your guests by name. It’s leaving a bottle of wine in the room of a couple celebrating their anniversary, or knowing which guest enjoys having a fresh cup of coffee brought to their room as part of a wake-up call. It’s the small, thoughtful, personal gestures that matter most and produce the greatest effect. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.