{HBR_LEAD_468x60.media}

Appointments & Promotions

LBA Hospitality Appoints Emily Thomas Director of Sales for Homewood Suites Chattanooga-Hamilton Place

CHATTANOOGA, TN. December 15, 2016 – LBA Hospitality, a full-scale hotel management, development and consulting firm, has appointed Emily Thomas director of sales of Homewood Suites by Hilton Chattanooga-Hamilton Place.

Thomas will head the sales department by fostering new and existing customer relationships within the Chattanooga community. She most recently served as the sales coordinator at DoubleTree by Hilton Decatur Riverfront and previously worked at Embassy Suites Tuscaloosa Downtown and the Tuscaloosa Tourism and Sports Commission.

“Thomas brings a wealth of Hilton brand knowledge, southern hospitality and a fresh approach to the property," President Beau Benton said. “Those assets and the property’s recent renovation are a winning combination for LBA and the Chattanooga area."

The recently renovated Homewood Suites Chattanooga offers 76 spacious one- and two-bedroom suites with new kitchen cabinetry, stainless steel appliances and beds. Each of the property’s public spaces, including the outdoor patio, have been refreshed. The hotel is conveniently located three miles from Lovell Field Airport and a short distance from attractions such as Hamilton Place Mall, Chattanooga Aquarium, Ruby Falls and Rock City.

About LBA Hospitality

Founded in 1973, LBA Hospitality is a full-scale hotel management, development and consulting firm. With more than 60 properties in 10 states, LBA Hospitality is the premier hotel developer for the Southeast. For more information, visit www.lbahospitality.com.

Contact:
Stephanie Fisher
Stephanie@msquaredpr.com
404-303-7797

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.