Business & Finance

Senate Confirms John Bryson for Commerce Secretary

October 24, 2011 - The U.S. Travel Association today applauded the U.S. Senate confirmation of John Bryson for commerce secretary. Bryson succeeds Gary Locke, U.S. Ambassador to China, who had been a strong advocate for improved traveler facilitation as commerce secretary.

“Thanks to his extensive experience in both the public and private sectors, John Bryson knows firsthand the important role that the $1.8 trillion travel industry plays in stimulating our economy and employing 14.1 million Americans,” said Roger Dow, president and CEO of the U.S. Travel Association. “We look forward to working with him on ways the travel industry can stimulate economic recovery, particularly through regaining America’s historic share of the overseas travel market, which would help meet the President’s stated goal of doubling U.S. exports.”

The U.S. Travel Association is the national, non-profit organization representing all components of the travel industry that generates $1.8 trillion in economic output and supports 14.1 million jobs. U.S. Travel's mission is to increase travel to and within the United States. Visit

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review

Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Original, Authentic and Localized
Corporate hotel developers once believed that their customers appreciated a homogenous design experience; that regardless of their physical location, they would be reassured and comforted by a similar look, feel and design in all their brand properties. Inevitably this led to a sense of impersonality, predictability and boredom in their guests who ultimately rejected this notion. Today's hotel customer is expecting an experience that is far more original and authentic - an experience that features a design aesthetic that is more location-oriented, inspired by local cultures, attractions, food and art. Architects and designers are investing more time to engage the local culture, and to integrate the unique qualities of each location into their hotel design. Expression of this design principle can take many shapes and forms. One trend is the adaptive reuse of existing facilities - from factories to office buildings - as a strategic way to preserve and affirm local culture. Many of these projects are not necessarily conversions of historic properties into grand, five-star landmark hotels, but rather a complete transformation of historic structures into mixed-use, residential, and hotel projects that take full advantage of their existing location. Another trend is the addition of local art into a hotel's design scheme. From small sculptures and photography to large-scale installations, integrating local art is an effective means to elevate and enhance a guest's perception and experience of the hotel. These are just a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.