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Karen Watson Named Spa Director at the Sagamore

AUGUST 6, 2008. Karen Watson has joined The Sagamore as spa director of The Sagamore Spa and Fitness Center. Watson brings nearly ten years of spa management experience to her new position, garnered in leading hotel destination spas across New England.

At The Sagamore, Watson will be responsible for the overall operations of the spa, salon, fitness and waterfront activities. This includes staff development and training, design and implementation of new services, treatments and activities, quality assurance, budgeting and guest relations.

Prior to joining The Sagamore, Watson was spa manager of Turning Stone Resort and Casino in Verona, NY, where she managed four distinct operations within the resort including The Salon and Day Spa, Tower Fitness Club, Skana Spa and Lodge Fitness Center. She was an integral part of the team involved in concept, design and opening of Skana Spa in 2006. Before that, Watson was with Canyon Ranch in the Berkshires in Lenox, MA, where she began her career in 1999 as Program Coordinator. She worked her way through a variety of positions of increasing responsibility, including massage administrator and massage director, ultimately being named assistant spa manager in 2004.

Watson's professional affiliations include membership in the International Spa Association (ISPA) and New York Spa Promotion Alliance (NYSPA), where she has served on the Board of Directors since 2007.

Recently renovated, The Sagamore Spa and Fitness Center preserves the resort's singular setting overlooking Lake George and the Adirondacks while expanding and enhancing its atmosphere of tranquility. The Sagamore Spa offers 13 treatment rooms in which guests can enjoy a wide selection of services performed by specially-trained and licensed therapists, including the newly-added Crystalline Massage and Facial.

In addition to its range of spa amenities and treatments, the facility features a 3,800-square-foot glass-enclosed exercise studio with panoramic views of Lake George. State-of-the-art equipment and a comprehensive array of exercise classes and opportunities, including stretching, aerobics, step aerobics, water aerobics, yoga and private hikes up an Adirondack peak, are among the Spa's offerings. The center offers advanced cardiovascular and fitness equipment, including a 12-station Cybex(R) Strength Circuit, Stairmasters(R), Lifecycles(R), Concept II Rowers and True Treadmills. Personal training, fitness evaluations and personalized home exercise programs are available as well.

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review

Feature Focus
Hotel Architecture and Design: Unique, Timeless and Memorable Design
With hotel refurbishments typically taking place every eight to ten years for the soft elements, and every fifteen to twenty years for public spaces and bathrooms, owners and investors rely on architects and designers to get things right. Their solutions must satisfy a targeted demographic, be aesthetically timeless and durable, and fulfill the marketís desire for unique and memorable design. From re-thinking guestroom configurations to constructing dramatic public spaces, an effort is being made to recast hotels as the highlight of any business trip or vacation. In that regard, many architects have chosen to make a striking first impression, with an emphasis on the hotel lobby. These areas are being designed as multi-use spaces to accommodate casual or formal talks, individual or group work, and zones for social activity. Creative space segmentation is required, along with furniture that provides comfort and functionality. More extravagant entrance features also include indoor waterfalls, large chandeliers and multi-media stations. The bathroom is also an area of interest for designers in recognition of guest desires to experience luxury beyond their everyday lives. Spa-like features such as en-suite bedrooms, waterfall showers, over-sized bathtubs, his & hers sinks, giant towels, plush robes, and deluxe beauty items provide the promise of indulgent luxury. Additionally, hotel restaurants can no longer afford to be mere providers of three meals a day and a buffet. Signature restaurants are being designed to offer a genuine "wow" factor to both guests and external patrons alike. Along with sustainability concerns and an increased emphasis on local sourcing, these are some of the subjects in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be explored in the June issue of the Hotel Business Review.