ADA Compliance
William A. Brewer III
  • ADA Compliance
  • DOJ to Industry – Pools and Spas Need At Least One Accessible Means of Entry
  • On January 31, 2013, the U.S. Department of Justice ("DOJ") implemented revised regulations covering what is required by public accommodations to meet the Americans With Disabilities Act standards for accessible design. The new standards mandate for the first time that pools and spas be made accessible at most places of lodging, including hotels. Advocates for people with disabilities have made clear that the time has come for the hospitality industry to comply or face the risk of sinking in a pool of private lawsuits and federal enforcement actions. Here is what you need to know about the new ADA standards and what to do if your venue does not comply. Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • Meeting the Needs of Multigenerational Travelers
  • The growing number of travelers that need special accommodations or access is changing the face of the hospitality industry forever. Currently there are more than 54 million Americans with disabilities. Additionally, somewhere between 7,000 and 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 everyday of the year and will do so for the next 19 years! How many of these baby boomers have – or will have in the future – different abilities that require special accommodations? Is your brand being proactive and making the adjustments necessary to meet the changing needs of the multigenerational travelers? How will you stay relevant? Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • Does Your Social Media Plan Include the ADA Community?
  • Social media allows anyone with an internet connection (web based or mobile) to interact with others in a personal or anonymous fashion and to engage in a non-threatening way. For consumers with different abilities, the benefits are even more profound since it offers them opportunities for participation. As the internet has morphed from an informational only resource to a more conversational style of interaction; the growth in social media interaction has become a tidal wave. Consumers can now enjoy the benefits that come from engaging with goods and services providers as well as socializing, enjoying entertainment or even working from a remote location or at home. Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • 2012 Check List: Is Your Property ADA Friendly?
  • Many hospitality properties have taken a proactive approach to the ADA changes and hired an independent firm to conduct an ADA compliance inspection or survey, others have decided to wait and see. While these new regulations promise positive change for those with different abilities; much more can be done in an effort to offer an ADA Friendly environment for those guests. Go beyond the required ADA access; consider adding some of the measures or ADA Friendly features from the 2012 Checklist and become a truly ADA friendly property. Read on...

Stephen  Barth
  • ADA Compliance
  • New ADA Standards Affecting Swimming Pools
  • What if someone told you that by spending an estimated $5,000 (sometimes a little less, sometimes a little more), you could show exceptional appreciation to the men and women that became disabled while protecting our rights during a war? Or what if you had a child that was disabled but loved to swim. Would you want them to be able to enjoy all of the amenities that a place of public accommodation has to offer, or would you want them to have to sit on the side of the pool while all of the other children were playing in it? Perhaps it is time to take a different perspective on the ADA. Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • Is Your Pool or Water Feature ADA Compliant?
  • With the recent ADA Compliance extension granted by the Department of Justice, the deadline for installation of water feature lifts have been has been pushed out until January 31, 2013. During this compliance extension, the department of Justice has announced that it will not enforce the fixed elements provision in the 2010 standards against those owners who purchased otherwise compliant portable lifts prior to March 15, 2012, as long as those owners keep the lifts in place for use and operational during all times that the water feature is open to guest. While this short reprieve has created a collective sigh of relief in the hospitality industry, it should not give license to complacency. It is almost certain that there will be very little leniency for those not compliant by this new deadline. Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • ADA Etiquette and Appropriate Terminology
  • Disability is one small fact about a person with different abilities, just like having red or black hair, green or blue eyes or wearing glasses. Looking beyond the disability, one will see an individual whose life is more similar to theirs than it is different. Discrimination - especially subtle discrimination - continues to thrive. It is everyday stereotypes and assumptions about our differences that are the basis for most discrimination. It is probable that many of these acts are not committed with malice but are the result of a lack of education about proper terminology and etiquette. Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • ADA Sensitivity Issues
  • Since ADA sensitivity is a growing concern in the hospitality industry, a proactive plan for training would seem prudent. Discrimination – especially subtle discrimination – continues to thrive. It is the everyday stereotypes and assumptions about our differences that are the basis for most unintentional discrimination and a lack of training about sensitivity issues that can result in these inadvertent offenses. Read on...

Soy Williams
  • ADA Compliance
  • Overview: Meeting the March 15, 2012 Deadline on ADA Compliance
  • It's hard to believe a year and a half has passed since the new Americans with Disabilities Act regulations were published by the U.S. Department of Justice. The deadline to comply with many new requirements have come and gone, and in two months all requirements become mandatory. The new regulations include general as well as specific provisions for lodging establishments and facilities. Read on for a list of policies, practices and procedures that should be part of every day operations along with a summary of capital improvements that might be necessary for continued ADA compliance. Read on...

William A. Brewer III
  • ADA Compliance
  • The ADA and Your Responsibility as an Owner or Operator
  • The hotel industry has become a target of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) for Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) enforcement actions and lawsuits. Whether action is prompted by a single guest complaint at a particular hotel or a sweeping DOJ investigation covering hotels in a designated geographical area, one thing is clear – no hotel is immune. Boutique, luxury and limited service hotels are all within the scope as the DOJ widens its target range. Read on...

Kathleen Pohlid
  • ADA Compliance
  • Integrating ADA Accommodations with Architectural Appeal
  • Hotels and other establishments that emphasize architectural appeal at the expense of accessibility are making a big mistake that can cause a loss of potential business, tarnish their brand, and increase their potential for legal liability. The Americans with Disability Act (ADA) sets forth accessibility standards to allow persons with disabilities to enjoy places of public accommodation to the same extent as those without disabilities. ADA compliance and architectural appeal are not mutually exclusive and achieving both can greatly enhance a hotel’s success. We will look at ten important principles and considerations to integrate into hotel architecture and design elements. Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • Understanding the ADA Compliance Changes
  • ADA compliance changes are coming; most businesses are already aware of this fact and have at least started talking about how it will affect them. The question is - how painful and complicated will this process be? Compliance changes are inevitable, they can be daunting and overwhelming or with a few simple steps and some professional advice they can be manageable. With nearly a quarter of the U.S. population looking for accessible places to stay or vacation – the hospitality industry can greatly benefit from being ADA compliant. So where do you start? Do you have a plan? What do these changes look like? Do you need some help understanding the ADA compliance changes? Read on...

Soy Williams
  • ADA Compliance
  • ADA Compliance: Wheelchairs and Other Power-Driven Mobility Devices
  • A line of travelers gliding effortlessly through the city scape on SegwayR PTs might invoke scenes from a 20th century sci-fi movie. Less commonplace might be an amputee among them using a seat that has been retrofitted onto the device. Something of a novelty still, SegwayR PTs have been at the hub of activity in the disability rights realm. These and other power-driven mobility devices have the United States government requiring lodging establishments to permit individuals with mobility disabilities using them in any areas of these facilities. Read on...

Kathleen Pohlid
  • ADA Compliance
  • ADA Compliancy Toward Hotel Parking
  • There is only one chance to make a good first impression. Trite as it may be, creating a good first impression can pave the way to attract business, establish a positive brand, and thwart potential liability. Hotels and other establishments which neglect their parking lots miss out on the opportunity to attract business. Worse yet, they may raise the potential for costly litigation and non-compliance under the Americans with Disabilities Act. As we will discuss, ADA compliant parking involves much more than designating a few parking spots as handicap accessible. Read on...

Clara  Rose
  • ADA Compliance
  • ADA Compliance and Your Bottom Line
  • How does the ADA community affect your bottom line? Is your property ADA compliant? Beyond compliant, is it actually ADA friendly? According to the U.S. Department of Labor, this demographic (the ADA community) has more than $175 billion in discretionary spending power. The business owners and hospitality properties that recognize the ADA community and their potential revenue contributions, surely have the edge. Such companies are working hard to be not just ADA compliant but truly ADA friendly. They are making a difference, while capturing some of the revenue dollars that affect their bottom line. Read on...

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OCTOBER: Revenue Management: Technology and Big Data

Steve  Van

Do you have a catering assistant whose first question each morning is Did we sell out? or What was our occupancy and ADR last night? What about a front office associate who is so hungry to earn the perfect sell incentive that every time she works the 3:00 to 11:00 shift and the hotel has just a few rooms left to sell, you can count on the fact that you are going to end up with a perfect sell? If so, you may have just found your next revenue manager! Read on...

Will Song

Airbnb is less than a decade old, but it has already begun to make waves in the travel industry. The online marketplace where individuals can list their apartments or rooms for guests to book has been able to secure a surprisingly stable foothold for itself. This has caused some hoteliers to worry that there’s a new competitor in the market with the potential to not only take away market share but drive prices down lower than ever. Let’s take a closer look at how Airbnb fits into the industry right now and then walk through the steps of the ways your hotel revenue management strategy can be adapted to the age of Airbnb. Read on...

Brian Bolf

Revenue management tends to be one of the most challenging hospitality disciplines to define, particularly due to the constant evolution of technology. Advancements in data processing, information technology, and artificial intelligence provide our industry with expanded opportunities to reach, connect, and learn from our guests. Ultimately, the primary goals of revenue management remain constant as the ever-evolving hospitality industry matures. We must keep these fundamentals top of mind, while proactively planning for the tighter targets that lay ahead. That said, how can we embrace these innovations, operate under constricted parameters, and learn from the practices used today to achieve our same goals moving forward? Read on...

Sanjay  Nagalia

Every year, it seems as though the hospitality industry faces more competition, new opportunities to leverage their data, and difficult organizational challenges to overcome to remain competitive in a hypercompetitive marketplace. The popularity of the sharing economy, dominating OTAs and a growing generation of often-puzzling consumers all give pause to hotels as they strategize for a more profitable future. Hotels have been feeling the heat from OTA competition for several years, causing many organizations to double down on their efforts to drive more direct bookings. Revamped loyalty programs, refined marketing campaigns and improvements to brand websites have all become primary focuses for hotel brands looking to turn the tables on their online competition. Read on...

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.