Development & Construction
Curtis Bashaw
  • Development & Construction
  • Making Historic Properties Relevant Today
  • Historic buildings are a window into the past. Unfortunately, few of them operate today as they were originally intended to, and, of those that do, only a handful have been successful at it. That 201-year-old hotel, by the way, is Congress Hall, which, with the exception of a politically-related closing early in its youth, has operated as a hotel and resort for nearly all of the last two centuries. Read on...

Susan Furbay
  • Development & Construction
  • Modular Construction: An Evolution in the Development of Modern Hotels
  • Though historically associated with residential and low-rise commercial buildings, modular construction has gone more upscale in recent years. What are the benefits, and what should hotel developers consider before going modular? The term “modular construction” once conjured images of small construction trailers or antiquated mobile home clusters just off the highway—not the most alluring draw for high-end developers and top-tier hotel companies, nor for their gentrified clientele. Today, however, the concept of modular construction has evolved, with developers across the U.S. adopting a modular approach to building 2- to 4-star select-service, full-service, and even boutique hotels. This article gives a brief overview of the evolution of modular construction, as well as the potential benefits and challenges in terms of cost, timelines, and financing when harnessing this method to build hotels. Read on...

Jan Kalanda
  • Development & Construction
  • Getting Ready to Sell: Eight Steps to Increasing Your Hotel's Value
  • To insure a sale at a good price, hospitality property owners should approach the market carefully and methodically. In this article, the authors review eight areas and recommend actions owners can take to improve the value of their property prior to sale. Selling your hotel or other hospitality property is a big step. You’ve invested time and resources in the property, so of course you hope for a good price when you go to market. To make a sale of you hotel happen at a good price you need to be sure you’ve optimized the property’s value before putting it on the market. Read on...

Sam Cicero
  • Development & Construction
  • Project Delivery Systems Value the Partners of a Renovation Team
  • There are various project delivery systems commonly used in today’s construction renovation projects, Design-Bid-Build, Construction Management and Design-Build. It’s important that an owner examines the pros and cons of each in order to determine which system works best for certain considerations such as project goals, costs to perform, timeline and risk management. In the Design-Bid-Build method, the owner engages entities such as the architect/engineer, designer and construction company separately. Since there is little if any connection between the different entities, this process requires a savvy owner who will be responsible for controlling all aspects of the design and construction process. One of the downfalls of this process, however, occurs if there are design errors for which the owner becomes at risk to the contractor. Read on...

Scott Acton
  • Development & Construction
  • The Benefits of Prefabricated Construction in High-Tourism Areas
  • In the hospitality and tourism industries, guests’ happiness reigns supreme. With ever-changing consumer demands and evolving technologies, new developments and renovations alike often cause disruptions to the normal function of businesses, impairing the public’s accessibility to the venue, or adjacent venues. Hence, construction timelines become a crucial issue with projects situated in high-density tourism areas. Improved time-efficiency minimizes the disturbances in local businesses’ operation and profitability. Yet, shorter timelines might come at a price of higher expenses on labor, machinery and materials. Read on...

Jeff Green
  • Development & Construction
  • A Limited-Service Hotel With Unlimited Connections
  • In biology, symbiotic mutualism describes a dynamic where two species living in close proximity to one another engage in a mutually beneficial relationship. Iconic examples include the oxpecker–small birds that feed on ticks and other parasites found on large mammals–and the clownfish, which live in and around sea anemones, enjoying the protection afforded by their stinging tentacles while providing the anemone with nutrients, and predator and parasite defense. The commercial real estate market is filled with a number of similarly structured relationships: mutually beneficial connections that serve to raise interest, drive traffic, provide resources and conveniences for shoppers and guests, and ultimately create a positive feedback loop that has a meaningful and sustained impact on the bottom line–for all parties. Read on...

Sam Cicero
  • Development & Construction
  • Performance Measures Can Help Hotel Owners and Managers Select the Right Renovation Contractor
  • When selecting renovation contractors, many hotel owners' and property managers’ decisions are based solely on the bottom line. In short, the lowest price bidder wins. Other hotel owners and managers, however, carefully consider the intricacies of their project’s scope and can assess the confidence they have in their selected contractor that the renovation can be finished on-time and on-budget. What these hotel owners appreciate that others don’t are the many value-added, non-financial advantages that a talented contractor brings to the project. For the purposes of this article I will refer to these advantages as 'performance measures'. Read on...

Bob Cerrone
  • Development & Construction
  • Distribution Partners are Critical to a Successful Renovation
  • The beginning of a hotel renovation marks the start of a ticking clock. When the clock runs out, renovation projects must be complete or the hotel faces consequences that range from losing reservations to unnecessary customer disruptions from a building still under construction during a major meeting or convention. These consequences are far greater than just inconveniencing guests; they mean poor reviews, lost revenue, and visitors who may never stay at the property again. Read on...

Kyle Rogg
  • Development & Construction
  • How Smart Design Changes Can Help Maximize a Hotel’s Operating Efficiency
  • Designing a hotel for operational efficiency can save owners money and increase a bottom line, while still offering guests aesthetically pleasing and comfortable rooms with competitive guests. In this article, Value Place's Chief Operating Officer and President Kyle Rogg will discuss how hotel owners can improve a hotel's efficiency through design changes in lighting, flooring, fixtures, geographic building designs, and energy management systems, as well as the monetary savings that can be achieved. Read on...

Rollin Bell
  • Development & Construction
  • Two Decades of Wall Coverings - What 20 Years in the Business Teaches About Quality and Value
  • If your hotel is 'behind the curve,' it might be time to start thinking about revitalizing your design. In addition to what you typically think about when you consider renovating, it's also important to reflect on the present condition of your wall coverings, especially in high-traffic areas such as your lobby. Creating an inviting lobby is crucial. It's an extension of your company's identity and, if it's a successful design, it can work to keep your employees and guests happy and loyal. People are usually willing to pay higher rates in exchange for a positive guest experience. Read on...

Julia Watson
  • Development & Construction
  • Is it Better to Renovate/Convert an Existing Asset or Build a New One?
  • For hoteliers, there are many variables to consider when trying to decide which is better – acquisition and renovation of an existing hotel or development of a new one? With so much to consider, it can be challenging to decipher which makes more financial sense. Objectively the end goal is to determine which will lead to profitability faster, but how is that determined? With the right plan of action to navigate the decision making process, the difficulty in reaching an educated decision can be greatly reduced. Regardless of your proposed project, there are a series of steps that can simplify the process when deciding to renovate or build. Read on...

Fred B. Roedel, III
  • Development & Construction
  • Location: Five Crucial Points to Address When Selecting a Hotel Location
  • The process of identifying, qualifying and acting on a new hotel location does not have to be a daunting or overwhelming task. In fact it can be a fun and exciting process as long as you establish your objectives and fully investigate the opportunities presented to you. Roedel Companies, through its construction management subsidiary, ROK Builders, is in the business of designing, building and renovating nationally branded hotels along the east coast of the United States, both for itself and independent investors. Over the past four years, ROK has completed over 40 major renovation projects along the east coast for independent investors. Learn about the five most crucial points to address when selecting a location for your hotel in this article. Read on...

Sara Fedele
  • Development & Construction
  • The Hotel Industry: Everything is Changing, But What Exactly is Changing?
  • What will be changing the hospitality business? How can we create effective business strategies? We all agree that running a business today is more complicated and requires more resources (financial, human, technological, etc.) than in the past. Have we ever asked ourselves why and what exactly it is that has really changed? The feedback that we receive from senior managers of international hotel corporations during think tanks and interactive workshops is always the same: "Everything is changing!"But what are the elements representing this “change”? Read on...

Fred B. Roedel, III
Julia Watson
  • Development & Construction
  • Hotel Development: The Risk of “Something for Nothing”
  • In a changed hospitality industry, post economic collapse, a new low-price standard has been set for construction services. How did construction pricing get to this point and what are the risks associated with hiring inexpensive labor to complete projects? We are a national general contractor specializing in hospitality construction services and are among a limited few who remain strong in the industry. Read on to learn about the conditions leading up to this point, where the industry is headed, and what to be mindful of for your next project. Read on...

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NOVEMBER: Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive

Eric Rahe

The advent of social media brought with it an important shift in the hospitality industry. Any guest’s experience might be amplified to thousands of potential customers, and you want to be sure that your hotel stands out for the right reasons. Furthermore, technology has increased competition. According to Euromonitor International, the travel industry will have the highest online payment percentage of any industry by 2020, often occurring through third-party sites that display your competitors alongside you. As a result, many hoteliers are looking to stand out by engaging customers and the experience has become more interactive than ever. Read on...

Pat Miller

Even the most luxurious hotel has a finite budget when it comes to the design or re-design of hotel spaces. The best designers prioritize expenses that have the biggest impact on guest perceptions, while minimizing or eliminating those that don’t. This story will focus on three blockbuster areas – the entry experience, the guest room, and the public spaces. This article will focus on these three key areas and shed light on how the decision making process and design choices made with care and attention can create memorable, luxe experiences without breaking the bank. Read on...

Patrick Burke

For over 35 years, American architect Patrick Burke, AIA has led Michael Graves Architecture & Design to create unique hospitality experiences for hotel operators and travelers around the globe, in Asia, Europe, the U.S. and the Middle East. As the hospitality industry has shifted from making travelers feel at home while away to providing more dynamic experiences, boutique hotels have evolved to create hyper local, immersive environments. Having witnessed and contributed to the movement, Burke discusses the value of authentic character that draws on physical and social context to create experiences that cannot be had anywhere else in the world. Read on...

Alan Roberts

More than ever before, guests want and expect the design of a hotel to accurately reflect its location, regardless of whether they visit a property in an urban center, a historic neighborhood or a resort destination. They also seek this sense of place without wanting to sacrifice the level and consistency of service they’ve come to expect from a beloved hotel brand. A unique guest experience is now something expected not just desirable from any hotel wishing to compete in the world today. A hotel’s distinctive design and execution goes a long way to attracting todays discerning customer. Read on...

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.