Eco-Friendly Practices
Ken Hutcheson
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Is it Time to Spruce up Your Landscape?
  • Now that summer is here, it might be time to enhance the appearance of your hotel’s grounds. If you think that trimming, edging, and mowing every other week will be enough, think again. Your landscape deserves the best in full-service grounds care carried out by trained experts with an eye for keeping your landscape healthy. Commercial grounds care is very different than residential landscaping, so even if your hotel has the best looking landscaping in the area, there are still circumstances you’ll need to consider in order to keep your grounds safe, healthy, and looking great. As a hotelier, ask yourself these five questions to help decide if it’s time to upgrade your landscape. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Do You Vote for Cows or Cars?
  • This article is not call for vegetarianism although there is a lot that can be said for eating more fruits, vegetables, and grains. This article is certainly not an environmentalist decree either, although a lot can be said about saving our planet’s natural resources. Nor is it another call for recycling, low energy light bulbs, and conserving water, although those are likewise noble goals. What it is, however, is a piece of the puzzle that can explain the consumers’ changing eating behaviors. And it presents both challenges and opportunities for every food operation from the Golden Arches to a luxury hotel. Yours included. You might think of it as feeding the future. Read on...

Larry  Gillanders
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Lead in Your Hotel's Drinking Water
  • There are approximately 6.5 million lead service pipes still in use in the United States. However, it’s lead leaching does not only occur solely as a result of lead pipes – often lead contributors are present, which may go unnoticed, although they can release dangerously high levels of lead. Learn more about lead contributors and critical steps you need to take to ensure your hotel isn’t liable for harmful lead leaching. Read on...

Circe Sher
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • h2hotel's Eco-Friendly View is All About You
  • When Piazza Hospitality first started developing its h2hotel concept and design in Healdsburg in the mid 2000s, “green” properties were hardly as well-known as they are today. Architects tended to simply follow Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines, and most consumers weren’t really clear on what “eco-friendly” meant. H2hotel’s Eco-Friendly View Is All About You The idea of being earth-friendly seemed like something everyone could and should embrace, but bringing that vision into a reality consumers actually wanted could be challenging. Read on...

Jan Peter Bergkvist
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • The True Value of Sustainability Beyond Eco-Friendliness
  • 193 out of 196 possible countries have agreed on the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and in 2015, 194 countries signed the Paris Agreement that includes a joint commitment to leave 80 per cent of known fossil fuel resources in the ground. These are signs of a paradigm shift that is happening right in front of our eyes. What does this shift mean for an individual hospitality executive in May 2017? Has it, or will it perhaps change the playing field dramatically? Read on...

Lynne A. Olson
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Take a Systematic Approach to Your Cleaning Program's Sustainability
  • When executed at the highest levels, sustainability is a win-win proposition for your lodging cleaning program. A successful program can cost effectively deliver clean, safe and healthy guest rooms, using efficient products that are simple for the housekeeping staff to use. Does this seem too good to be true? If so, let’s review the historical approach, and then explore a framework for the systematic design of a sustainable lodging cleaning program. Read on...

Nancy Loman Scanlon, Ph.D.
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • The UN's Sustainable Development Goals and Lodging Practices
  • Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility practices in the Hotel Industry have been developing in a synergistic pattern that is reflected in the web pages and annual reports of many international lodging companies. In 2015 the United Nations revised the original 8 UN Millennium Development Goals to better the quality of life on the planet by 2015, establishing the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's) to be achieved by the year 2030. Reflecting the original Millennium Development Goals, the 17 SDG's include eliminating poverty and hunger, fighting climate change, improving world health, education and saving oceans and forests. Read on...

Ken Hutcheson
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Keeping Your Hotel's Landscape Healthy and Safe on a Budget
  • Your hotel’s landscape is responsible for making a first impression with your guests. Your landscape should be a reflection of your hotel’s brand and should clearly demonstrate to your customers the type of experience you hope your property will deliver—relaxing, comfortable, safe, and fun. In other words, dedicating financial resources to landscaping and grounds keeping are more than worthwhile from an ROI perspective. Nevertheless, as any hotel executive knows, unforeseen circumstances often require difficult budget decisions. If you are forced to dedicate less budget and resources to your landscaping, follow these best practices to ensure that your landscape’s health, aesthetics, and safety do not suffer. Read on...

Eric Ricaurte
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Nine Green Must-Dos to Place Your Hotel Ahead of the Curve
  • In 2011, we visited the 10 hotels contracted in the room block for the Greenbuild conference in Toronto. As part of their award-winning sustainable event program, the conference organizers embedded green practices into the contract language for these hotels, who either had to comply with the requirements, explain their reason why they couldn’t implement them, or pay a $1,000 fine. Part of our consulting work was to gather the data and confirm some of the practices on-site. Read on...

Susan Tinnish
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Best Practices That Create Small Wins in Sustainability
  • Hotels brands have actively engaged in large-scale efforts to become more environmentally friendly. Individual hotels have made great strides on property. Many significant large-scale eco-initiatives s are most easily built initially into the infrastructure and design of the building and surrounding areas. Given that the adaptation of these large-scale changes into the existing asset base is expensive and disruptive, hotels seek different ways to demonstrate their commitment to sustainability and eco-friendly practices. One way to do so is to shift the focus from large-scale change to “small wins.” Small wins can help a hotel create a culture of sustainability. Read on...

Shannon Sentman
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Smart Data for Dumb Buildings
  • Utility costs are the second largest operating expense for most hotels. Successfully reducing these expenses can be a huge value-add strategy for executives. Doing this effectively requires more than just a one-time investment in efficiency upgrades. It requires ongoing visibility into a building’s performance and effectively leveraging this visibility to take action. Too often, efficiency strategies center on a one-time effort to identify opportunities with little consideration for establishing ongoing practices to better manage a building’s performance ongoing. Read on...

Joshua Zinder, AIA
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Adaptive Reuse, a Strategic and Sustainable Way to Penetrate New Markets
  • Discussions of sustainability in the hospitality industry have focused mainly on strategies at the level of energy-efficient and eco-friendly adjustments to operations and maintenance. These "tweaks" can include programs to reduce water usage, updating lighting to LEDs, campaigns to increase guest participation in recycling, and similar innovative industry initiatives. Often overlooked—not only by industry experts but even by hotel operators and designers—are possibilities for hotel design and construction that can make a property truly sustainable from the get-go. Read on...

Scott Parisi
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Energy Benchmarking: Tracking Real Time Energy Usage
  • The hospitality industry is a unique sector when factoring in the total amount of guests that visit any given facility in a single year. Most commercial buildings do not see nearly the amount of people visiting their facilities in comparison to the lodging industry’s visits. The Environmental Protection Agency has reported, “on average, America’s 47,000 hotels spend $2,196 per available room each year on energy.” Read on...

Rauni Kew
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Hospitality Needs to Shift Its Attention to People
  • In 1994 & 1995 a British economist working on corporate social responsibility coined two phrases- Triple Bottom Line, and later People Planet & Profit. The simple three word phrase describes a sea change in hotel operations that would take place over the next 2 decades. John Elkington’s minimal catch phrases for the complex theories of sustainability were easy to understand and provided a simple road map for business. Recognizing cost savings from reductions in water, waste, energy and chemicals as well as the value of preserving regional icons as travel destinations, the Planet piece of Elkington’s phrase is now accepted as mainstream hotel operation. Read on...

Lawrence Adams
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • The Wellness Trend in Hospitality
  • Explore the evolution of wellness in hospitality from the early days of Greco-Roman Thermae to the thermal spas of Central Europe and US resort towns to ultra-modern spas in the heart of the Swiss Alps. As wellness takes on a renewed importance in hospitality, we see medical science-based technological innovation applied to the health and well-being of hotel guests through the Stay Well Rooms program created by health-centric real estate developer Delos. Learn how major hotel firms are incorporating robust wellness programs into their brands. Watch wellness evolve to satisfy growing market demands with technological advances and innovative programs. Read on...

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JUNE: Sales & Marketing: Who Owns the Guest?

Emanuel Baudart

Social media opens the doors to conversations about experiences – good or bad. Twitter gives hotel guests the option to air their grievances while Instagram gives them the bragging rights on their best days. Customers are giving out their feedback and it’s up to the industry to take it seriously in how hotels engage with their guests. A guest’s social media is an opportunity for hotels to work better and more efficiently to target and enhance the guest experience. Coupling the data that guests give through social media with the data we have from years of growing AccorHotels, we are focusing on using the right tools to best access the guest. At AccorHotels, we are moving away from the transactional model of hospitality and focusing on building relationships through social engagement and bolstering the benefits of our loyalty program. In order to do both, we’ve invested in building better tools for our hotels to succeed on the promise of hospitality – great service, attention and comfort. Read on...

Wendy Blaney

In a world where almost everything is done digitally, it is important to remember how impactful a two-way conversation can be for consumers interested in booking travel. There is no denying that it has become easier and easier to plan trips online, and purchase products almost instantly – yet there are still many customers who want the personal touch and assurance that they truly understand what it is that they are buying. They want someone to provide direction, answer questions, and give them “insider” information. This is especially true for a dynamic destination like Atlantis where there are an abundance of options. Our guests aren’t just interested in a resort, they are seeking a coveted, catered experience. Read on...

Mustafa Menekse

Though it seems that online travel agencies have been a part of the hotel booking landscape for eons, the reality is that just 25 years ago, brick and mortar travel agencies were the norm. Travelers would visit an agency for trip planning advice, printed brochures, and to speak with actual travel agents to assist in booking airfare, hotel accommodations and rental cars. Travel agencies had the knowledge and information about the destination and, of course, the tools and connections to book hotels and flights to begin with. The support these agencies provided put traveler’s minds at ease, especially for international trips. This was the foundation of why OTAs are in existence. Read on...

Scott Weiler

A guest of a hotel or chain books with an OTA. Terrific for everyone, right? The OTA is grateful for the transaction, and hopes to get a nice share of that customer’s travel bookings for years to come. The hotel is happy to get a (let’s say) first time guest. Sure, they paid a commission for that booking, but the GM and their team is ready to do their stuff. Which is to say – deliver a great stay experience. Now what? Now it’s a battle of the marketers! Read on...

Coming Up In The July Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Spa: Measuring the Results
As the Hotel Spa and Wellness Movement continues to flourish, spa operations are seeking new and innovative ways to expand their menu of services to attract even more people to their facilities, and to and measure the results of spa treatments. Whether it’s spa, fitness, wellness meet guest expectations. Among new developments, there seems to be a growing emphasis on science to define or beauty services, guests are becoming increasingly careful about what they ingest, inhale or put on their skin, and they are requesting scientific data on the treatments they receive. They are open to exploring the benefits of alternative therapies – like brain fitness exercises, electro-magnetic treatments, and chromotherapy – but only if they have been validated scientifically. Similarly, some spas are integrating select medical services and procedures into their operations, continuing the convergence of hotel spas with the medical world. Parents are also increasingly concerned about the health and well-being of their children and are willing to devote time and money to overcome their poor diets, constant stress, and hours spent hunched over computer, tablet and smartphone screens. Parents are investing in wellness-centric family vacations; yoga and massage for kids; mindfulness and meditation classes; and healthy, locally sourced, organic food. For hotel spas, this trend represents a significant area for future growth. Other trends include the proliferation of Wellness Festivals which celebrate health and well-being, and position hotel spas front and center. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.