Spas, Health & Wellness
Jane Segerberg
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • FIVE Spa Design/Renovation Must Haves
  • We are no longer mouthing the words, "Doing business in a brand new way". With the recent changes in the economic climate and subsequent changes in travel patterns and customer loyalty, we are doing business in a brand new way and saying "Who do we want to attract and who do we want to keep as loyal customers?" In the spa business, the anchor currently is the Baby Boomers. Read on...

Nina Curtis
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Spa Retail Management: Creating a Strategic Retail Plan
  • Through the months, I have written on several aspects of spa retail management and this issue's topic on Creating a Strategic Retail Plan is crucial for the future success and sustainability of the spa as a strategic business unit (sbu) of the hotel. As a sbu of the hotel, the spa's strategic retail plan should consider the overall strategy of the hotel and find ways to create a congruent plan of action so that seamless results are achieved. This sends a dynamic message in the branding of the spa as a cohesive unit. Read on...

Elaine Fenard
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • How to Maximize Your Spa's Retail
  • In this challenging economy, one of the quickest ways to turn around sluggish spa sales is to focus on retail. Generally, most spa locations overlook retail's potential without realizing they are missing out on increased revenue potential. A well run spa with a heightened focus on retail can achieve a 20-30% retail-to-treatment revenue ratio, a play that can provide a noticeable boost to the bottom line. The good news for operators is that with a few simple changes and without a large financial investment, attaining the 20-30% goal isn't just within reach, it's realistic. Here's how: Read on...

Jane Segerberg
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • The Keys to a Smooth Running Spa
  • Spas are a necessity for resorts and hotels. The Spa Business is experiencing an exponential growth rate. The number of Spa Goers is growing. Spas are hotel profit centers. Great statements! Great trends! What are the realities that these trends bring? The supply of spas has grown to the point that competition and consumer knowledge has changed the face of the industry. Now it is not just "a spa" that is necessary for a resort or hotel, it is a spa with an experience that is special for each guest along with service that is so seamless that the guest is not aware of it. No matter how spectacular the architectural features, or chic the interior design, or how creative the spa menu; if the experience and service delivery falls short, then guests do not recommend or return to the spa. Read on...

Elaine Fenard
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Identifying the Ideal Software for Your Spa
  • More than ever the spa industry has embraced technology to create better guest experiences and maintain more efficient business operations. In this article, we look at what a spa operator should know and ask before deciding which spa software platform would be best for his or her spa. The key message here is to be prepared before you go shopping. Read on...

Gary Henkin
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • How to Maximize Your Spa's Bottom Line
  • In this day and age, it is ever more important to maximize your spa's opportunities for financial success and a positive bottom line. Consumers are making choices now to consider options outside of hotel spas both for convenience and pocketbook reasons. This is creating more bottom line challenges and stress on spas located within hotels and resorts, particularly if they are located within an urban (as opposed to a resort or "destination") environment. All too often, spas are not giving themselves a chance to produce a positive bottom line by not emphasizing some basic tenets required to drive revenue while cost effectively managing expenses. This article will offer a number of initiatives and approaches to achieve and maximize a positive net operating income for your spa. Read on...

Kurt A. Broadhag
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Incorporating Spa-like Principles into Your Hotel Fitness Center
  • In the current state of fitness in the hospitality industry it is not enough to offer a bare bones non-staffed fitness center consisting of a select few pieces of exercise equipment. To set themselves apart, hotels must now reinvent the whole concept of the hotel fitness center, shying away from the old concept of creating an environment where the avid fitness enthusiast can supplement their at-home workout and try to draw in a new demographic of guests many of whom are intimidated by the traditional gym setting. Read on...

Jacqueline Clarke
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Chinese Spa Consumer Goes Up-market
  • It is widely known that the Chinese beauty and wellness market is very large and growing fast. The 370,200 salons and spas in the US are dwarfed by China's 1.72 million salons/spas with their 9 million employees. In addition, it has also been turning in double digit growth rates for many years now and is shortly expected to overtake France as a purchaser of cosmetic products. Read on...

Bryan Green
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Fitness Matters: Staying Strong in a Weak Economy
  • There isn't a business that isn't being challenged by our current economy, and hospitality is certainly no exception. During these stressful times, your guests - many of them business travelers struggling with these financial challenges, will need the therapeutic qualities of fitness and exercise more than ever. Neglecting an emphasis on fitness services could be a big mistake, that jeopardizes customer satisfaction and loyalty. Check out national fitness business expert Bryan Green's story "Keep Fitness Strong During a Weak Economy" where he'll tell you how you can "pump up" your business through fitness, in the face of today's economic challenges. Read on...

Peter Anderson
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Trends in the Hotel Spa Industry
  • Today in most resorts the inclusion of a spa is no longer a luxury, but rather a standard amenity, expected and ubiquitous. Significant cross pollinating among the day, medical, amenity, and destination spas has created a competitive and comprehensive spa environment that here-to-fore that has never been experienced. This dynamic has created the phenomenon of Spa Wars, where product differentiation is subtle and the competitive edge can be paper thin. It is ironic that as the spa industry matures, distinctions between spa types are becoming blurred, resulting in subtle levels of segmentation and product differentiation that provide "options" to the savvy spa goer and "confusion" to the rest of us. Historically, hotel and resort spas have been classified as either "destination" or "amenity", meaning they were either the specific reason to travel to a remote location or they were and an added amenity (sometimes created as an after thought) for the an indulgent resort clientele. Read on...

Peggy Borgman
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Measuring Employee Productivity in the Hotel Spa
  • Measuring employee productivity in the "stay" spa differs significantly from doing the same in the day spa environment. Day spas look hard at statistics such as client retention and retail ratios. Hotel spa employees work with a transient guest, who is, according to popular wisdom, less likely to return and less likely to buy. Or are they? Not all "stay" spas are the same. Understanding typical guest behavior can enable you to create realistic measurements of guest retention by spa employees. Read on...

Jane Segerberg
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Spa Consultants - Who Needs Them?
  • Spas in resort and hotel properties are no longer an amenity that sets the property apart from its competitors - - spas are now a necessity and as a necessity, require more than build-it-and-they-will-will come planning. For the hotelier who is exploring the advantages of hiring a consultant or is already convinced that a spa consultant is a necessity for the project and wants to make a good choice, this article is intended to be helpful in understanding the role of the full service spa consultant and how to sort through the maize to find the right consulting firm for your property. Read on...

Kurt A. Broadhag
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Maintenance and Your Hotel Fitness Center
  • In the traditional health club business model gyms either succeed or fail based upon membership numbers. Smart gym owners realize the importance of providing a service that satisfies their customers and view the facility maintenance as an integral component in customer satisfaction. This train of thought is right in line with many current surveys. Studies show that prospective clients rank maintenance and upkeep of a fitness center second in terms of their decision-making process, just below facility location and convenience. Studies also show that current members place even more of an importance on facility cleanliness, ranking it #1 in customer satisfaction. Since the hospitality industry places such great emphasis on providing guests with the best possible customer service it is easy to see the connection of facility maintenance within the hotels fitness center. Read on...

Peter Anderson
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Spa Development and Asset Management: Human Capital Management
  • Not only is payroll the largest single expense item on your profit and loss statement, but it's important to remember that spa clients generally only interface with line employees, such as their massage therapist or esthetician. If professionalism is not engrained into the fabric of your corporate culture and your employees are not truly enthusiastic about your operation, you may be setting yourself up for problems. Read on...

AUGUST: Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key

Paul Hancock

Vegetables are no longer served as garnishes or accompaniments but, center stage in the dining scene in this day. Plate design and bold flavors are more paramount than ever. The “wow” effect is in full effect. Guests are more eager to try something new more than ever before. It is entertainment, so it has to be great and throughout the dining experience. There is a cultural shift happening right in front of our eyes with vegetables. Vegetables have been the unsung heroes of the plate for many decades. That is changing. Read on...

Robert  Hood

What does a restaurant look like in 2017? To define what a restaurant is is a difficult process and not an easy thing to do considering that foodservice has evolved so much and comes in so many shapes and sizes. In 2017 restaurants are not even defined for having chairs or tables for diners or even want diners to stay after the point of food purchase and the sale is completed. This is the world of the ‘QSR’ or ‘Quick Service Restaurant’ and since it arrived it has changed restaurant culture, our food service experiences on an almost daily basis, and begs the question ‘is QSR the new fine dining?’ Read on...

Chris Ferrier

Many hotels are overwhelmed by the thought of putting together a ‘buy local’ or ‘farm-to-table’ culinary program when they also have to serve many guests. Where do you start? Should chefs contact all the local farms, breweries, wineries, fish mongers, meat and poultry farms in their area? Should they visit each farm? Many years ago, this was what we did; but with 1,200 meals to prepare, often we would clear out the farmers’ goods and still not have enough for what we needed. Read on...

Bobby Martyna

A key trend in hotel development is making the hotel lobby a destination for guests. Where in the past, the focus was primarily on the guest room, moving forward, brands and independents are looking to transform the lobby into a space where guests can socialize, work, snack and dine. In order for the lobby destination to be both compelling and memorable, the retail design, visual merchandising and food selection need to convey what is special about the location and must work together to deliver a surpassing guest experience. Read on...

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Group Meetings: Blue Skies Ahead
After a decade of sacrifice and struggle, it seems that hotels and meeting planners have every reason to be optimistic about the group meeting business going forward. By every industry benchmark and measure, 2017 is shaping up to be a record year, which means more meetings in more locations for more attendees. And though no one in the industry is complaining about this rosy outlook, the strong demand is increasing competition among meeting planners across the board – for the most desirable locations, for the best hotels, for the most creative experiences, for the most talented chefs, and for the best technology available. Because of this robust demand, hotels are in the driver’s seat and they are flexing their collective muscles. Even though over 100,000 new rooms were added last year, hotel rates are expected to rise by a minimum of 4.0%, and they are also charging fees on amenities that were often gratis in the past. In addition, hotels are offering shorter lead times on booking commitments, forcing planners to sign contracts earlier than in past years. Planners are having to work more quickly and to commit farther in advance to secure key properties. Planners are also having to meet increased attendee expectations. They no longer are content with a trade show and a few dinners; they want an experience. Planners need to find ways to create a meaningful experience to ensure that attendees walk away with an impactful memory. This kind of experiential learning can generate a deeper emotional connection, which can ultimately result in increased brand recognition, client retention, and incremental sales. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group business and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.