Spas, Health & Wellness
Edward Donaldson
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Spas: Luxury Hotels Continue To Raise The Bar With Newer and More Robust Spas
  • First it was a restaurant; then it was a gym; now the "must have" for luxury hotels is a spa. Responding to the increasing demands of luxury travelers for pampering and self-indulgence, several members of Small Luxury Hotels of the World have either opened a spa in the last year or are planning to do so in the coming year. Spas are truly changing the landscape of hotels and the way in which hoteliers structure their properties. Be it for business or leisure, guests are looking for those extra amenities to make their stay special. A spa is now that one thing that really represents the luxury lifestyle-experience. Read on...

Casey Olsen
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Spa Liability - Are You Paying Attention?
  • Your spa is a place that your guest delights in relaxation and escape. Not always. A spa facility has a myriad of liability pitfalls and potential risks, for both your guest and staff. It is alarming how many spa owners pay little attention to these issues, until, of course, they receive a notice from an attorney's office of a suit being filed. Then, your Spa Director is called in to determine "What happened?" By then it's too late. We offer the following guideline as a starting point to bring to light just some of the safety issues that you may not have addressed within your facility. Let's walk through your facility and address each area for its potential jeopardy. Read on...

Jane Segerberg
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Maximizing Your Spa's Revenue
  • Thirteen years ago, when I entered the Spa Industry as the manager of a new Resort Spa, the number of spas and spa-goers were few and having a spa at a hotel or resort was a novel amenity that was not expected to be profitable. Soon it was realized that there was a demand for the spa experience along with greater expectations. Hotels and resorts then began to take the bull by the horns and realize that not unlike their other retail outlets; good concept planning, management and marketing were important to the spa's success. With the change in the spa's financial expectations came spas that were managed and marketed with increasing know-how. Read on...

Nina Curtis
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Hotel Spas: How to Make Sure You are Selling the Right Products
  • It should be known by now that all we do is connected to selling. We sell concepts, dreams, fantasies, hope, results, and more. But so often we only think that the products on the shelf are all that we sell, but this is far from the truth and usually the last thing we sell, if we sell at all. It would behoove all of us to take inventory on what we are really selling so that we know how to clearly and consistently market it to our potential guest. Read on...

Jane Segerberg
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • FIVE Spa Design/Renovation Must Haves
  • We are no longer mouthing the words, "Doing business in a brand new way". With the recent changes in the economic climate and subsequent changes in travel patterns and customer loyalty, we are doing business in a brand new way and saying "Who do we want to attract and who do we want to keep as loyal customers?" In the spa business, the anchor currently is the Baby Boomers. Read on...

Nina Curtis
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Spa Retail Management: Creating a Strategic Retail Plan
  • Through the months, I have written on several aspects of spa retail management and this issue's topic on Creating a Strategic Retail Plan is crucial for the future success and sustainability of the spa as a strategic business unit (sbu) of the hotel. As a sbu of the hotel, the spa's strategic retail plan should consider the overall strategy of the hotel and find ways to create a congruent plan of action so that seamless results are achieved. This sends a dynamic message in the branding of the spa as a cohesive unit. Read on...

Elaine Fenard
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • How to Maximize Your Spa's Retail
  • In this challenging economy, one of the quickest ways to turn around sluggish spa sales is to focus on retail. Generally, most spa locations overlook retail's potential without realizing they are missing out on increased revenue potential. A well run spa with a heightened focus on retail can achieve a 20-30% retail-to-treatment revenue ratio, a play that can provide a noticeable boost to the bottom line. The good news for operators is that with a few simple changes and without a large financial investment, attaining the 20-30% goal isn't just within reach, it's realistic. Here's how: Read on...

Jane Segerberg
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • The Keys to a Smooth Running Spa
  • Spas are a necessity for resorts and hotels. The Spa Business is experiencing an exponential growth rate. The number of Spa Goers is growing. Spas are hotel profit centers. Great statements! Great trends! What are the realities that these trends bring? The supply of spas has grown to the point that competition and consumer knowledge has changed the face of the industry. Now it is not just "a spa" that is necessary for a resort or hotel, it is a spa with an experience that is special for each guest along with service that is so seamless that the guest is not aware of it. No matter how spectacular the architectural features, or chic the interior design, or how creative the spa menu; if the experience and service delivery falls short, then guests do not recommend or return to the spa. Read on...

Elaine Fenard
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Identifying the Ideal Software for Your Spa
  • More than ever the spa industry has embraced technology to create better guest experiences and maintain more efficient business operations. In this article, we look at what a spa operator should know and ask before deciding which spa software platform would be best for his or her spa. The key message here is to be prepared before you go shopping. Read on...

Gary Henkin
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • How to Maximize Your Spa's Bottom Line
  • In this day and age, it is ever more important to maximize your spa's opportunities for financial success and a positive bottom line. Consumers are making choices now to consider options outside of hotel spas both for convenience and pocketbook reasons. This is creating more bottom line challenges and stress on spas located within hotels and resorts, particularly if they are located within an urban (as opposed to a resort or "destination") environment. All too often, spas are not giving themselves a chance to produce a positive bottom line by not emphasizing some basic tenets required to drive revenue while cost effectively managing expenses. This article will offer a number of initiatives and approaches to achieve and maximize a positive net operating income for your spa. Read on...

Kurt A. Broadhag
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Incorporating Spa-like Principles into Your Hotel Fitness Center
  • In the current state of fitness in the hospitality industry it is not enough to offer a bare bones non-staffed fitness center consisting of a select few pieces of exercise equipment. To set themselves apart, hotels must now reinvent the whole concept of the hotel fitness center, shying away from the old concept of creating an environment where the avid fitness enthusiast can supplement their at-home workout and try to draw in a new demographic of guests many of whom are intimidated by the traditional gym setting. Read on...

Jacqueline Clarke
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Chinese Spa Consumer Goes Up-market
  • It is widely known that the Chinese beauty and wellness market is very large and growing fast. The 370,200 salons and spas in the US are dwarfed by China's 1.72 million salons/spas with their 9 million employees. In addition, it has also been turning in double digit growth rates for many years now and is shortly expected to overtake France as a purchaser of cosmetic products. Read on...

Bryan Green
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Fitness Matters: Staying Strong in a Weak Economy
  • There isn't a business that isn't being challenged by our current economy, and hospitality is certainly no exception. During these stressful times, your guests - many of them business travelers struggling with these financial challenges, will need the therapeutic qualities of fitness and exercise more than ever. Neglecting an emphasis on fitness services could be a big mistake, that jeopardizes customer satisfaction and loyalty. Check out national fitness business expert Bryan Green's story "Keep Fitness Strong During a Weak Economy" where he'll tell you how you can "pump up" your business through fitness, in the face of today's economic challenges. Read on...

Peter Anderson
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Trends in the Hotel Spa Industry
  • Today in most resorts the inclusion of a spa is no longer a luxury, but rather a standard amenity, expected and ubiquitous. Significant cross pollinating among the day, medical, amenity, and destination spas has created a competitive and comprehensive spa environment that here-to-fore that has never been experienced. This dynamic has created the phenomenon of Spa Wars, where product differentiation is subtle and the competitive edge can be paper thin. It is ironic that as the spa industry matures, distinctions between spa types are becoming blurred, resulting in subtle levels of segmentation and product differentiation that provide "options" to the savvy spa goer and "confusion" to the rest of us. Historically, hotel and resort spas have been classified as either "destination" or "amenity", meaning they were either the specific reason to travel to a remote location or they were and an added amenity (sometimes created as an after thought) for the an indulgent resort clientele. Read on...

Peggy Borgman
  • Spas, Health & Wellness
  • Measuring Employee Productivity in the Hotel Spa
  • Measuring employee productivity in the "stay" spa differs significantly from doing the same in the day spa environment. Day spas look hard at statistics such as client retention and retail ratios. Hotel spa employees work with a transient guest, who is, according to popular wisdom, less likely to return and less likely to buy. Or are they? Not all "stay" spas are the same. Understanding typical guest behavior can enable you to create realistic measurements of guest retention by spa employees. Read on...

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OCTOBER: Revenue Management: Technology and Big Data

Gary Isenberg

Hotel room night inventory is the hotel industry’s most precious commodity. Hotel revenue management has evolved into a complex and fragmented process. Today’s onsite revenue manager is influenced greatly by four competing forces, each armed with their own set of revenue goals and objectives -- as if there are virtually four individual revenue managers, each with its own distinct interests. So many divergent purposes oftentimes leading to conflicts that, if left unchecked, can significantly damper hotel revenues and profits. Read on...

Jon Higbie

For years, hotels have housed their Revenue Management systems on their premises. This was possible because data sets were huge but manageable, and required large but not overwhelming amounts of computing power. However, these on-premise systems are a thing of the past. In the era of Big Data, the cost of building and maintaining an extensive computing infrastructure is incredibly expensive. The solution – cloud computing. The cloud allows hotels to create innovative Revenue Management applications that deliver revenue uplift and customized guest experiences. Without the cloud, hotels risk remaining handcuffed to their current Revenue Management solutions – and falling behind competitors. Read on...

Jenna Smith

You do not have to be a hospitality professional to recognize the influx and impact of new technologies in the hotel industry. Guests are becoming familiar with using virtual room keys on their smartphones to check in, and online resources like review sites and online travel agencies (OTAs) continue to shape the way consumers make decisions and book rooms. Behind the scenes, sales and marketing professionals are using new tools to communicate with guests, enhance operational efficiencies, and improve service by addressing guests’ needs and solving problems quickly and with a minimum of disruption. Read on...

Yatish Nathraj

Technology is becoming an ever more growing part of the hospitality industry and it has helped us increase efficiency for guest check-inn, simplified the night audit process and now has the opportunity to increase our revenue production. These systems need hands on calibration to ensure they are optimized for your operations. As a manager you need to understand how these systems work and what kind of return on investment your business is getting. Although some of these systems maybe mistaken as a “set it and forget it” product, these highly sophisticated tools need local expert like you and your team to analysis the data it gives you and input new data requirements. Read on...

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, it’s that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort – one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms – they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.