Security & Safety
Richard Hudak
  • Security & Safety
  • Resorts: A Unique Security Challenge
  • Resort security is no longer a second or third priority. Real dangers exist resulting in loss of life, destruction of property and ruined business reputation. Guests, patrons and public opinion fed by the media, expect reasonable safety and security at resorts where they vacation. Executive management must revisit their priorities and provide additional budgeting and organizational support for security. If the existing Security Manager or Director is not qualified for appointment to the Executive Management Team, a replacement should be hired. Finally, resort security officers, their appearance, ability to communicate and how professionally they respond, reflect the reputation of the resort and the competency of resort management. The consequence of inadequate security should not be underestimated. Read on...

James Filsinger
  • Security & Safety
  • Protecting Guests, Protecting Reputations: The Risks of Not Securing Guest Transactional Data
  • In a world where everyone is increasingly engaged with online transactional systems, it is readily apparent that the convenience afforded by live information sharing and online payment services must be balanced and underscored by a solid security framework. In the hotel sector, where card payment technology to book rooms and for actual transactions during guest stays is common, it becomes a much higher priority. Smart hoteliers can combat this risk by adhering to the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS). Read on...

Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • Keep Your Hotel a Summer Hot Spot for Clientele, Not Cockroaches
  • The weather's warming up, which means peak travel season is approaching for the summer vacation set. Ensure your hotel remains a destination hot spot for clientele and not for cockroaches, which are especially active during the warmer months and can hitch a ride into your facility on guest luggage and deliveries. Learn how to identify these unwanted pests and what health hazards they pose to your guests. Stay up-to-date on cockroach management with a program to prevent cockroaches from "checking in" and tips to safeguard against an infestation that can wreck both your brand's reputation and your bottom line. Read on...

Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • Bed Bugs: New Issues, Same Old Foe
  • Bed bugs. You can't turn on the television without hearing about this insidious pest. They're everywhere, and businesses nationwide have been affected. Bed bugs have made their way from the bedroom to the boardroom - not to mention, retail establishments, schools and even airplanes. But the fact remains that bed bugs are still a large problem for the hospitality industry. Read on...

Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • How to Get Over a Pest Infestation at Your Hotel
  • In the hospitality industry, word-of-mouth can be your best friend, but it can also be your worst enemy. While guests are quick to talk about your attentive service and efficient staff, they are even quicker to talk about any encounters they may have had with bed bugs, rodents or other pests during their stay. A pest problem can be detrimental to your hotel's brand and credibility. However, a few simple steps can help any hotelier work through a pest crisis and some even simpler steps can help them prevent the issue from ever coming to a head. Read on...

Venkat Rajagopal
  • Security & Safety
  • Housekeeping: Hygiene Matters
  • Cleaning is important not only from the point of hygiene but also from the point of safety, security and complying with legislation. Hygiene is an important issue to all kinds of accommodation seekers irrespective of whatkind of accommodation they seek. When the accommodation provider continues to ignore hygiene that will meet guest expectations, no guest is going to return back. Key to any successful cleaning programme is the employee should learn about the brand's core value for which they are working. Accommodation providers should conduct regular audit on hygiene and keep staff well trained on what to look on their daily rounds. Read on...

Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • Build Pests Out of Your Hotel: Incorporate Pest Management into Your Next Redesign
  • Hotel renovations often focus on guest-pleasing amenities, new design considerations or technologically advanced upgrades. While these will certainly draw more clientele, you want to attract the right customers. Renovations can appeal to another type of guests entirely – pests. But, there’s good news: Pest management doesn’t have to wait until your hotel is up and running. You can start preventing pests beginning at preliminary stages. With so many details to monitor during a renovation, it’s important to not let pest control slip through the cracks; otherwise, you’ll have pests coming through the cracks at your hotel. Read on...

Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • Keep Your Property's Exterior Pest-free Using Cost-Effective Techniques
  • A pest sighting in your hotel is never a good thing. One guest could tell another guest, who tells another, and the next thing you know, the incident hits the Internet waves for all to read - ultimately damaging your hotel's reputation and business. But the good news is you can stop this nightmare before it starts. Simple exterior maintenance practices are one the easiest ways to prevent pests' entry into your establishment, and the best part is they are cost-effective too. Read on for several exterior maintenance practices that you can put in place immediately to keep pests outside where they belong. Read on...

Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • Keep Stored-product Pests Out of the Kitchen
  • Stored product pests may be at the top of your kitchen pest "Most Wanted" list. Pests such as weevils, moths and beetles are dangerous to the quality and safety of food prepared in hotel kitchens. Some species can secrete chemicals that alter the flavor of food products, while others can cause allergic reactions and irritate the human digestive tract if ingested - all posing risks to your guests and your establishment's reputation. Read on to learn about the types of stored-product pests that can creep into your hotel kitchen and how you and your kitchen staff can effectively prevent and manage stored-product pest infestations. Read on...

Richard Dahm
  • Security & Safety
  • White Paper: Protecting Yourself And Your Business Against Swine Flu
  • While swine flu is a significant health threat, if we are armed with the knowledge about what it is, how it is transmitted, and what is being done to combat the threat nationally and globally, we can be better prepared to deal with this crisis. Additionally, there are concrete steps we can take to ensure our personal safety and health, and the continued vitality of our business operations in the event of an influenza pandemic. Read on for a thorough explanation of the swine flu and how the travel industry can prepare themselves for the worse case scenario. Read on...

Frank Meek
Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • How to Keep Pests from Turning Your Five-Star Restaurant into a No-Star Restaurant
  • As a hotelier, you are constantly trying to differentiate your hotel brand. Whether it's upgrading mattresses in guestrooms or extending check out past noon, hotels are always seeking new ways to stand out from the competition. Many hotels entice tourists and business travelers by offering on-site fine dining at four- or five-star restaurants; however, this strategy attracts unwanted "visitors" as well - pests. Just like humans, pests need food and water sources to survive, and what better place to find a nice meal than in a hotel kitchen. Read on...

Peter Goldmann
  • Security & Safety
  • How to Manage the Growing Threat to Confidential Information Security
  • The news headlines are chock full of accounts of massive volumes of confidential corporate information being stolen, including customer credit card data, medical records, Social Security numbers, corporate trade secrets, trademarked and copyrighted intellectual property and more. The results of these attacks, though hard to accurately measure in dollars and cents, are nonetheless devastating for both the victimized company and the customers, employees and contractors whose personal identifying data is stolen. In the largest theft of confidential information ever, the apparel retailer, TJX Inc., had its databases attacked by outside hackers to the tune of over 45 million retail transaction records, involving countless numbers of credit and debit card files. Read on...

Frank Meek
  • Security & Safety
  • Control Flies with Integrated Pest Management
  • Whether it's lounging by the pool, enjoying dinner at a nice restaurant or just relaxing with a good book, your guests' favorite vacation activities can quickly be disrupted with the sound of an annoying "buzz..." Besides serving as a nuisance, flies also pose serious health risks to your guests and staff. Since flies feed on feces and other decaying matter, they can carry up to a half billion bacteria on the outside of their bodies, including E. coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus. In fact, flies are the No. 1 transmitters of disease in the world. Read on...

Peter Goldmann
  • Security & Safety
  • How to Investigate Identity Theft When Your Properties are Targets
  • The problem for hospitality companies, among others, is that thieves have found more and more ways to steal customer credit card and other personal information in order to create counterfeit credit cards in the victim's name.,..or to use the credit card information to fraudulently purchase goods over the Internet with the victim's identity. In addition, restaurant and front desk point-of-sale locations are common "hang-outs" for dishonest employees armed with credit card "skimmers" that record guest credit card data for later use in identity fraud. Read on...

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NOVEMBER: Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive

Eric Rahe

The advent of social media brought with it an important shift in the hospitality industry. Any guest’s experience might be amplified to thousands of potential customers, and you want to be sure that your hotel stands out for the right reasons. Furthermore, technology has increased competition. According to Euromonitor International, the travel industry will have the highest online payment percentage of any industry by 2020, often occurring through third-party sites that display your competitors alongside you. As a result, many hoteliers are looking to stand out by engaging customers and the experience has become more interactive than ever. Read on...

Pat Miller

Even the most luxurious hotel has a finite budget when it comes to the design or re-design of hotel spaces. The best designers prioritize expenses that have the biggest impact on guest perceptions, while minimizing or eliminating those that don’t. This story will focus on three blockbuster areas – the entry experience, the guest room, and the public spaces. This article will focus on these three key areas and shed light on how the decision making process and design choices made with care and attention can create memorable, luxe experiences without breaking the bank. Read on...

Patrick Burke

For over 35 years, American architect Patrick Burke, AIA has led Michael Graves Architecture & Design to create unique hospitality experiences for hotel operators and travelers around the globe, in Asia, Europe, the U.S. and the Middle East. As the hospitality industry has shifted from making travelers feel at home while away to providing more dynamic experiences, boutique hotels have evolved to create hyper local, immersive environments. Having witnessed and contributed to the movement, Burke discusses the value of authentic character that draws on physical and social context to create experiences that cannot be had anywhere else in the world. Read on...

Alan Roberts

More than ever before, guests want and expect the design of a hotel to accurately reflect its location, regardless of whether they visit a property in an urban center, a historic neighborhood or a resort destination. They also seek this sense of place without wanting to sacrifice the level and consistency of service they’ve come to expect from a beloved hotel brand. A unique guest experience is now something expected not just desirable from any hotel wishing to compete in the world today. A hotel’s distinctive design and execution goes a long way to attracting todays discerning customer. Read on...

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Issues & Events
There is not a single area of a hotel’s operation that isn’t touched by some aspect of the law. Hotels and management companies employ an army of lawyers to advise and, if necessary, litigate issues which arise in the course of conducting their business. These lawyers typically specialize in specific areas of the law – real estate, construction, development, leasing, liability, franchising, food & beverage, human resources, environmental, insurance, taxes and more. In addition, issues and events can occur within the industry that have a major impact on the whole, and can spur further legal activity. One event which is certain to cause repercussions is Marriott International’s acquisition of Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide. This newly combined company is now the largest hotel company in the world, encompassing 30 hotel brands, 5,500 hotels under management, and 1.1 million hotel rooms worldwide. In the hospitality industry, scale is particularly important – the most profitable companies are those with the most rooms in the most locations. As a result, this mega- transaction is likely to provoke an increase in Mergers & Acquisitions industry-wide. Many experts believe other larger hotel companies will now join forces with smaller operators to avoid being outpaced in the market. Companies that had not previously considered consolidation are now more likely to do so. Another legal issue facing the industry is the regulation of alternative lodging companies such as Airbnb and other firms that offer private, short-term rentals. Cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles and Santa Monica are at the forefront of efforts to legalize and control short-term rentals. However, those cities are finding it’s much easier to adopt regulations on short-term rentals than it is to actually enforce them. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine these and other critical issues pertaining to hotel law and how some companies are adapting to them.