Ms. Bermont

Sales & Marketing

The Easiest Way to Achieve Your Goals - It's All in Your State of Mind

By Debbie Bermont, President, Source Communications

Everyone knows that if you want to achieve a goal, you need a well thought out plan and a timetable to implement the plan. It seems like a relatively simple process that would make any goal obtainable. This makes sense in theory, but in reality the best of intentions many times turn into un-kept promises to yourself or others, a missed business deadline, a downturn in sales or a decrease in productivity.

Your mindset is the fundamental barometer which will dictate whether you are more likely to succeed or fail in reaching any goal. This includes a sales goal, a management goal or a personal productivity goal. The goal could be small or large. It doesn't matter. Your success or failure will be dependant upon what type of mindset you adopt before you take action to achieve your goal. If you adopt the right mindset before you implement your plan of action, you will have a much greater chance of success.

When you adopt a specific mindset permanently it becomes your state of being and will forever influence the way you make decisions and prioritize your actions.

When you adopt the right mindset that is congruent in supporting your goal, you will consistently focus all of your actions on reaching your goal. Here's an example to illustrate the point about how your state of being influences the way you prioritize your actions. Helen Jones, the Director of Sales for Hotel ABC, is an extremely organized person. Her office is always tidy. She doesn't have any files sitting on top of her desk unless it is a file that she needs to use immediately. Her computer work station is always clear. Her office is always clean when she leaves to go home. Helen's state of being is organized. She places a priority on keeping her work space organized so she immediately puts away anything she is not using. She doesn't need to set aside special periods of time to organize her office.

Howard Smith, Director of Catering for Hotel XYZ, is the opposite. Being organized is not his normal state. His office is usually in a state of disarray. When he's in the middle of a project he has files on his desk, his chair and his floor. He has papers and contracts everywhere. He has stacks of business mail, **correspondence and articles sitting on top of his office cabinet. Frequently his desk is a mess when he leaves his office at night. Soon the piles of paper and files start mounting up and eventually important pieces of paper get buried on his desk. Then he has to stop what he's doing just to search for what he needs. About every four weeks he plans to get organized. He sets aside a large chunk of time to go through the stacks of paper in his office to get them organized. Keeping papers filed away is not a priority to him and ultimately he spends five times longer getting his office into an organized state than it takes Helen.

Helen places a high importance on being organized so she sets a high priority on immediately filing away any paper that is not being used. Being organized is a desire of Howard's but it is not his state of being so he doesn't place a priority on immediately filing away paper he's not using. Eventually he ends up spending wasted time searching for information in his disorganized office. There are many days when he leaves the office and mentally sets a goal to straighten it the next morning. Then as soon as he gets to work his phone rings or he must run to a meeting and he ends up turning his attention to other matters instead of organizing his office. Without the permanent mindset of being organized he loses focus and determination to reach his goal of organization.

Since being organized is not Howard's normal state of being he does not place a priority on filing away papers in his office on a regular basis. The only time he has a mindset to be organized is when his office gets so cluttered he can't find anything. Then he adopts a temporary mindset to be organized and spends hours throwing out unneeded notes and pieces of paper. Once his office is clean and organized, he goes back to working with his old habits and does not keep up with filing, so, it gets messy again.

In the business environment people tend to adopt a temporary "mindset" when they are reacting to a negative situation. In the previous example, Howard only adopted a temporary "mindset" of being organized when his office was so messy he couldn't locate important contracts quickly. On the other hand Helen never has a problem locating essential papers quickly because being organized is a permanent mindset for her so she places a priority on always organizing her papers.

If you don't approach your business from the right mindset, you will spend more time and energy reaching your goals. And there is a very good chance you might not reach your goals at all because you will put a priority on spending time on actions that have nothing to do with your intended plan of action.

Your normal state of being can include wearing several mindsets at the same time. You can consider yourself to be prosperous, healthy, organized and trustworthy. This means you will consistently do activities to keep yourself in all of these states. You can be eating a healthy lunch and still keep your office clean and work on your sales plan to attract more clients. You never have just one mindset. The problem is when you adopt one or more mindsets that are not helpful to achieving your goals.

What mindsets would you need to adopt in order to take the right actions now to help you achieve your goal? Let's say your goal is to increase your sales by 20% in the next 12 months. What mindsets would you need to adopt which would make it easy for you to place a priority on the activities which will help achieve your sales goal?

Here are some mindsets to consider:

  • Prosperous
  • Reliable
  • Resourceful
  • Creative
  • Focused
  • Ambitious
  • Confident
  • Trustworthy
  • Determined

Keep in mind that you typically adopt a particular mindset on a temporary basis when you are trying to put yourself in a state that is not usually normal for you. You might be thinking to yourself: If this mindset is not my natural state of being how do I adopt it permanently?

There are a couple of solutions which can help you answer that question.

Solution #1: If a certain mindset is not your normal state of being, you could work with someone who has that permanent mindset to help you out. For example, since being organized is not Howard's permanent state of being he could have an assistant organize his office or hire a professional organizer to keep his office organized.

Solution #2: You can "act as if" this was your permanent mindset. If you were a disorganized person and wanted to adopt a mindset of being organized as a permanent state you would say to yourself: "If I were an organized person what would I do on a consistent basis to always keep my office tidy?" Then write down the answers:

If I were an organized person I would take these actions consistently:

  • If you don't know what a person would do that has that type of mindset, ask someone who does have that permanent mindset to help you with the answers. Now you have just created the plan that someone with this mindset would take on a consistent basis and you pull out the plan everyday and read it and then actually do the activities. Eventually they will become a permanent habit and your natural state of being. Soon you will place a priority on the activities in the plan to keep yourself in the permanent state of being you desire.
  • The next time you set a business goal, you must determine what mindset(s) you would need to adopt permanently in order to be successful in reaching that goal. Once these mindsets are your permanent states of being, you are on your way to reaching your goal easily and effortlessly.

Debbie Bermont is president of Source Communications, a marketing consulting firm, and author of Outrageous Business Growth- The Fast Track To Explosive Sales In Any Economy. Debbie is a leading expert on helping businesses reduce their marketing costs and accelerating their sales growth. Ms. Bermont can be contacted at 619-291-6951 or Debbie@outrageousbusinessgrowth.com Extended Bio...

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