Mr. Feeney

Human Resources, Recruitment & Training

Has the 'Net Made Old-Fashioned Recruiting Obsolete?

By Paul Feeney, President, Sanford Rose Associates

Alas, while companies across the country have experimented and implemented electronic recruiting as a very beneficial and cost effective tool, results can be decidedly mixed for recruiting for all positions. In order to understand the potential and the pitfalls of on-line searches, those who are considering a cruise on the Internet may appreciate a few words of explanation first.

Much of this business presence is found on the Internet, the "Yellow Pages" of cyberspace. All sorts of for-profit and nonprofit organizations have established Home Pages on the Web to promote their products and services (and, in some cases, to advertise for job applicants).

The Function of Outside Recruiters

Recruiters of executive, managerial and professional talent know one simple truth: If hiring managers didn't have problems finding people, they wouldn't turn to outside recruiters for help. When a position opening occurs, the ideal solution often may be to promote a qualified candidate from within - assuming that one exists. (In some situations, however, the company may want the fresh perspective of an outsider.) Promotion from within costs nothing, enhances at least one employee's career and bolsters organizational morale.

The next best solution, especially at lower levels, may be an existing employee's referral (usually a financial "reward" is now the norm with many firms) of a respected business or personal acquaintance. After that, a lot of companies will turn to advertising - at least once.

What happens when you have advertised in some local newspapers and on some of the more popular job recruitment web sites and you have not found "the most suitably qualified candidates?" These days it is very easy to apply to a few jobs online in a matter of minutes, but this will also mean that many candidates will send resumes everywhere to every company "spraying and praying" whether they are qualified for a position or not. When advertising produces several thousand resumes of people who are looking for work and (after laborious screening) prove to be under-qualified, over-qualified or simply lackluster, employers at last enlist a professional recruiter.

In many instances companies will turn to outside recruitment firms where they can identify the very best people are usually not "in" the job market and, hence, are not reading want ads. For middle and senior management positions, professional search consultants know how to identify the best candidates, regardless of whether they are actively seeking new employment opportunities. Professional recruiters also know how to interview these candidates on a highly confidential basis, protecting the interests of both client and candidate. And they know how to screen out the 95% who may "look great on paper," but who lack the specific skills, work experience and personality to match the client's job requirements and corporate culture.

Although recruiting has greatly changed the speed and efficiency in identifying people for positions, the rules of the game have not. Vast amounts of information about the a company can be found via their web site, financial information and online chat rooms regarding public opinion (be it good or bad!).

Companies still want people to join their firm for the right reasons and potential candidates are still looking for the same things with employers that existed before the Internet. The speed at which the Internet can have people react to a potential as changed with the Internet and email that people can react much quicker, than the bad old days of snail mail and fax.

Things might have changed with the Internet but the rules of the game of recruiting have not changed that much as long as we are still dealing with human beings!

Paul Feeney is President of Sanford Rose Associates, an Executive Search Firm. Sanford Rose Associates was founded in 1959, is a full-service executive search organization conducting retained and contingency searches through a network of 60+ offices worldwide devotes its practice to all areas of finance, accounting, general management, operations, technology, management consulting and project management for national and international searches. Paul has over 18 years of executive search management and corporate recruiting experience while working in New York, London and Prague. Mr. Feeney can be contacted at 973-492-5424 or pffeeney@sanfordrose.com Extended Bio...

HotelExecutive.com retains the copyright to the articles published in the Hotel Business Review. Articles cannot be republished without prior written consent by HotelExecutive.com.

Receive our daily newsletter with the latest breaking news and hotel management best practices.
Hotel Business Review on Facebook
RESOURCE CENTER - SEARCH ARCHIVES
General Search:

AUGUST: Food and Beverage: Going Local

Kevin   Fliess

When hotel technology is mentioned, planners often think of audio-visual and Wi-Fi coverage in meeting and guest rooms. Those things, however, comprise only the tip of the tech iceberg; as hoteliers know, the real technology accomplishments begin way before attendee arrival. For the business of putting heads in beds – and groups in meeting rooms – the industry increasingly relies on technology that is itself evolving. In only a few short years, for example, data storage has evolved from proprietary servers (something you can spill coffee on) to virtual “cloud-based” technology, which allows for exponentially more data. READ MORE

Kevin Iwamoto

Ask any hotel executive what their top goals are and they will unanimously say driving more revenue from group meetings, selling more room nights, and increasing market share. Hotels can’t just keep hiring sales headcount in order to increase market share, generate more leads, and respond to eRFPs. Additionally, the coverage they would need to expand market share is cost prohibitive and daunting at best—especially overseas in Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. READ MORE

Claire Repass

There is no stopping the sharing economy train, and the route that conductors like AirBnb are navigating cut directly across the existing revenue paths laid by hotels. It’s no longer an option to ignore the presence of the sharing economy, nor is it wise to fight against it. Managing the horizon of this rapidly changing marketplace, however, is where hotels will find their greatest strength. By tailoring the consumer and corporate travel sectors with a personalized service strategy, and looking across the tracks at AirBnB’s best practices, your hotel can both compete and flourish in light of the sharing economy. READ MORE

Michael C. Sturman

Technology forms a bridge between the complementary goals of tradeshow exhibitors and attendees. A survey of more than 2,500 tradeshow participants finds that exhibitors are focused on building client lists and showing new products, while attendees visit the show primarily for educational purposes. Tradeshow venues are increasingly seeking the technology “sweet spot” that connects the two groups despite their contrasting agendas. READ MORE

Coming Up In The October Online Hotel Business Review


Feature Focus
Revenue Management: Optimizing Income Streams Across All Avenues
The role of Revenue Managers, within their profession and the organizations they serve, continues to evolve. A significant portion of the change is driven by technological innovation which, given its magnitude in today’s markets, also redefines their standing on the hotel team. Revenue Managers are moving away from being exclusively spreadsheet-centric and finding better ways to share their data. This shift also requires them to engage more directly with their sales, marketing, and operations departments. Part of this development is due to a reassessment of their metrics for success. Revenue was previously the sole factor by which success was determined but now there is a greater emphasis on price optimization, profitability and flow through. Managers are combining sales, marketing and revenue management, and then adopting a data approach to optimize their income streams across all avenues. This metric evaluates performance in all revenue streams and then calculates the gross operating profit per available room. Hotels are now measuring everything a guest does - and spends money on - from the time he books until the moment he checks out. In addition, Revenue Managers will soon be able to shift their focus from room availability to the guest and his ability to pay. A future revenue management system might take into account things like weather forecasts, the recent online activity of the guest, the guest profile and persona, time of booking, the mode of travel and the fare paid. It might also calculate all the previous stays for this guest, and how much was spent on their room and in the hotel. All of this will be compared to millions of other potential future reservations to determine a unique room and rate for a specific individual guest. The October issue of the Hotel Business Review will address all these developments and document how some hotels are executing their revenue management strategies.