Mr. Feeney

Human Resources, Recruitment & Training

Has the 'Net Made Old-Fashioned Recruiting Obsolete?

By Paul Feeney, President, Sanford Rose Associates

Alas, while companies across the country have experimented and implemented electronic recruiting as a very beneficial and cost effective tool, results can be decidedly mixed for recruiting for all positions. In order to understand the potential and the pitfalls of on-line searches, those who are considering a cruise on the Internet may appreciate a few words of explanation first.

Much of this business presence is found on the Internet, the "Yellow Pages" of cyberspace. All sorts of for-profit and nonprofit organizations have established Home Pages on the Web to promote their products and services (and, in some cases, to advertise for job applicants).

The Function of Outside Recruiters

Recruiters of executive, managerial and professional talent know one simple truth: If hiring managers didn't have problems finding people, they wouldn't turn to outside recruiters for help. When a position opening occurs, the ideal solution often may be to promote a qualified candidate from within - assuming that one exists. (In some situations, however, the company may want the fresh perspective of an outsider.) Promotion from within costs nothing, enhances at least one employee's career and bolsters organizational morale.

The next best solution, especially at lower levels, may be an existing employee's referral (usually a financial "reward" is now the norm with many firms) of a respected business or personal acquaintance. After that, a lot of companies will turn to advertising - at least once.

What happens when you have advertised in some local newspapers and on some of the more popular job recruitment web sites and you have not found "the most suitably qualified candidates?" These days it is very easy to apply to a few jobs online in a matter of minutes, but this will also mean that many candidates will send resumes everywhere to every company "spraying and praying" whether they are qualified for a position or not. When advertising produces several thousand resumes of people who are looking for work and (after laborious screening) prove to be under-qualified, over-qualified or simply lackluster, employers at last enlist a professional recruiter.

In many instances companies will turn to outside recruitment firms where they can identify the very best people are usually not "in" the job market and, hence, are not reading want ads. For middle and senior management positions, professional search consultants know how to identify the best candidates, regardless of whether they are actively seeking new employment opportunities. Professional recruiters also know how to interview these candidates on a highly confidential basis, protecting the interests of both client and candidate. And they know how to screen out the 95% who may "look great on paper," but who lack the specific skills, work experience and personality to match the client's job requirements and corporate culture.

Although recruiting has greatly changed the speed and efficiency in identifying people for positions, the rules of the game have not. Vast amounts of information about the a company can be found via their web site, financial information and online chat rooms regarding public opinion (be it good or bad!).

Companies still want people to join their firm for the right reasons and potential candidates are still looking for the same things with employers that existed before the Internet. The speed at which the Internet can have people react to a potential as changed with the Internet and email that people can react much quicker, than the bad old days of snail mail and fax.

Things might have changed with the Internet but the rules of the game of recruiting have not changed that much as long as we are still dealing with human beings!

Paul Feeney is President of Sanford Rose Associates, an Executive Search Firm. Sanford Rose Associates was founded in 1959, is a full-service executive search organization conducting retained and contingency searches through a network of 60+ offices worldwide devotes its practice to all areas of finance, accounting, general management, operations, technology, management consulting and project management for national and international searches. Paul has over 18 years of executive search management and corporate recruiting experience while working in New York, London and Prague. Mr. Feeney can be contacted at 973-492-5424 or pffeeney@sanfordrose.com Extended Bio...

HotelExecutive.com retains the copyright to the articles published in the Hotel Business Review. Articles cannot be republished without prior written consent by HotelExecutive.com.

Receive our daily newsletter with the latest breaking news and hotel management best practices.
Hotel Business Review on Facebook
RESOURCE CENTER - SEARCH ARCHIVES
General Search:

JULY: Hotel Spa: Branding Around the Concept of Wellness

Lola  Roeh

While many industries are notorious for employee turnover, it is particularly painful for hospitality, where guest service is such a crucial part of the product. How painful? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the hospitality and leisure industry had the second largest number of employees voluntarily quit their jobs in 2014, with more than 6,000 people choosing to leave their current position. READ MORE

Tracey Anne Latkovic

Wellness is seemingly everywhere. Our shampoo comes from the corner of healthy and happy; our workstations allow for standing, sitting, and walking; fast food joints are now in the healthy choices game; and even our margaritas’ are skinny. The proliferation of health and wellness opportunities that have been thrust into our lives in the last few years have most of us wondering which end is up. Remember the 90’s? The low-fat, no fat, low-calorie, no calorie craze had our heads spinning and guess what? We ended up fatter than ever. We need to look beyond the hype to discover what’s best for our well-being. READ MORE

Mia Kyricos

Remember back in the day when the possibility of a hotel with a pool was enough to get customers excited about a pending stay? Fitness centers became the next “it” thing, followed by spas, which often began as “after thoughts,” thanks to a little extra basement space left on the construction drawings. Then for those hoteliers savvy enough to understand the appeal, spas were marketed as amenities, begrudgingly accepted as cost centers and widely misunderstood operationally. But guests sure did enjoy a good massage. My, have things changed. Or have they? READ MORE

Ann  Brown

The spa industry is constantly changing. Keeping up with evolving client mindsets, and of course, trends in the marketplace can be a challenge for any business. And to top it off hotel spas have to be flexible enough to incorporate changes into every part of the business - hospitality, spa and fitness, dining - it all has to come together perfectly to make guests have an experience that will make them come back. READ MORE

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review




Feature Focus
Food and Beverage: Going Local
"Going local" is no longer a trend; it’s a colossal phenomenon that shows no sign of dissipating. There is a near obsession with slow, real, farm-to-table food that is organic, nutritious and locally sourced. In response, hotel chefs are creating menus that are customized to accommodate all the vegans, vegetarians, gluten-free, paleo, diabetics and other diet-conscious guests who are demanding healthy alternatives to traditional restaurant fare. In addition, there is a social component to this movement. In some cases, chefs are escorting guests to local markets to select fresh ingredients and then visit a local cooking school to prepare their purchases. Other hotels are getting guests involved in gardening activities, or exploring local farms, bakeries and the shops of other culinary artisans. Part of the appeal is in knowing the story behind the food - being personally aware of the source and integrity of the product, and how it was handled. In addition to this "locavore" movement, there are other food-related developments which are becoming popular with hotel guests. Small plate and tasting-only menus are proliferating around the country. Tasting-only special event menus offer numerous benefits including guaranteed revenue per customer, reservations usually made weeks in advance, and an exciting dining option for guests to experience. Bread and butter are also getting a makeover as chefs are replacing bread baskets with boards, and replacing butter with custom-flavored spreads. One dining establishment offers a veritable smorgasbord of exotic spreads including garlic mostarda, vanilla tapenade, rosemary hummus, salsa butter, porcini oil and tomato jam, to name just a few. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document some current trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what various leading hotels are doing to enhance and expand this area of their business.