Ms. Dietrich

Social Media & Relationship Marketing

Developing a Comprehensive PR Plan for Your Hotel

By Gini Dietrich, Founder & CEO, Arment Dietrich Inc.

Last month you wrote your objectives and strategies. Now you're ready to begin writing the tactics in order to achieve results.

When people think of public relations, they automatically think "Oh! That person can get me on Oprah!" While someone like Oprah can make you, it's very rare for a company to be on her show, unless it's a company owned by a celebrity. You must think about targeted trade publications and reporters at your daily newspaper and business journal. You also must think about additional tactics you can do that are directly translated back to sales.

If you don't have any experience working with reporters, I'm going to recommend you hire someone to help you. In future columns, I'm going to give you tips for conducting interviews, so you're prepared for talking with the media.

This week, I'm going to help you find tactics that work for you and will help you increase sales.

Did you do your homework last month? Did you look at other companies you like? Did you figure out what they do well? Did you look at your competition? Did you figure out what they do well?

What I'd like you to do now is write a list of those things. They might include:

What other ideas do you have?

Now let's go back to your objectives and strategies. How are you going to achieve each of them in the next 90 days, six months, and year?

I like lists and calendars. List your first objective and the strategies that accompany it. Then list the tactics you're going to use to achieve them. Then take a blank calendar and start inputting the tactics in it.

For instance, you know you want to send a direct mail postcard to new neighbors every month. Add "send postcard" to your calendar on the first Monday of every month. And then back it out from there: You'll need to decide on the offer, write the copy, design the postcard, get the printed, make certain you have enough money in your post office account, and mail them. All of these should be on your calendar.

I like to think of our calendars as "roadmaps" for doing our client's work. One of us could win the lottery and then our clients would be up a creek because we'd have a hard time picking up where that person left off. But with the calendar, if you're having an off day or someone on your staff leaves, you simply have to look at it to see what comes next.

Once you have your calendar complete for one tactic, go on to the next idea. Ask your team what they would like to do. Pay attention to what your competition is doing. And copy them! Add all of these ideas to your calendar so you have a fluid and active work plan. Public relations is about relationships with reporters, organization, attention to detail, and talking to your target audiences at the right times. This calendar will help you with everything but the relationships.

The relationships with reporters you have to do on your own. Future articles will tell you exactly how to build relationships with the reporters you should be working with, but in the meantime, I want you to read the newspaper, read the business journal, and read the trade publications.

I'll give you a hint, for HotelExecutive.com you want to talk to one of my favorite Aussies - Benedict Cummins. Shoot him an email and tell him why you think your hotel is different and why he should feature you in an upcoming email blast. And keep him updated on new happenings; i.e. new construction, acquisitions, remodelings, new flags, new products/services, new senior-level hires, etc. Figure out who you should be talking to at all of the other publications you read and call them! Most will take your call and will be happy to hear from you.

Gini Dietrich is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Arment Dietrich, Inc. Arment Dietrich, Inc. is a Chicago-based, integrated marketing communications firm. She is the author of the book, “Spin Sucks”, and co-author of the book, “Marketing in the Round”. She is also co-host of Inside PR, and founder of Spin Sucks Pro. Ms. Dietrich’s blog, Spin Sucks, is the number one PR blog in the world. Actively engaged in social media and blogging since 2006, Ms. Dietrich has advised many clients on how to incorporate digital media into a larger, and more integrated, marketing program. She can be found on Spin Sucks, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram. Ms. Dietrich can be contacted at 312-787-7249 or gini.dietrich@armentdietrich.com Extended Bio...

HotelExecutive.com retains the copyright to the articles published in the Hotel Business Review. Articles cannot be republished without prior written consent by HotelExecutive.com.

Receive our daily newsletter with the latest breaking news and hotel management best practices.
Hotel Business Review on Facebook
RESOURCE CENTER - SEARCH ARCHIVES
General Search:

AUGUST: Food & Beverage: Multiplicity and Diversity are Key

Paul Hancock

Vegetables are no longer served as garnishes or accompaniments but, center stage in the dining scene in this day. Plate design and bold flavors are more paramount than ever. The “wow” effect is in full effect. Guests are more eager to try something new more than ever before. It is entertainment, so it has to be great and throughout the dining experience. There is a cultural shift happening right in front of our eyes with vegetables. Vegetables have been the unsung heroes of the plate for many decades. That is changing. READ MORE

Robert  Hood

What does a restaurant look like in 2017? To define what a restaurant is is a difficult process and not an easy thing to do considering that foodservice has evolved so much and comes in so many shapes and sizes. In 2017 restaurants are not even defined for having chairs or tables for diners or even want diners to stay after the point of food purchase and the sale is completed. This is the world of the ‘QSR’ or ‘Quick Service Restaurant’ and since it arrived it has changed restaurant culture, our food service experiences on an almost daily basis, and begs the question ‘is QSR the new fine dining?’ READ MORE

Chris Ferrier

Many hotels are overwhelmed by the thought of putting together a ‘buy local’ or ‘farm-to-table’ culinary program when they also have to serve many guests. Where do you start? Should chefs contact all the local farms, breweries, wineries, fish mongers, meat and poultry farms in their area? Should they visit each farm? Many years ago, this was what we did; but with 1,200 meals to prepare, often we would clear out the farmers’ goods and still not have enough for what we needed. READ MORE

Bobby Martyna

A key trend in hotel development is making the hotel lobby a destination for guests. Where in the past, the focus was primarily on the guest room, moving forward, brands and independents are looking to transform the lobby into a space where guests can socialize, work, snack and dine. In order for the lobby destination to be both compelling and memorable, the retail design, visual merchandising and food selection need to convey what is special about the location and must work together to deliver a surpassing guest experience. READ MORE

Coming Up In The September Online Hotel Business Review




{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Hotel Group Meetings: Blue Skies Ahead
After a decade of sacrifice and struggle, it seems that hotels and meeting planners have every reason to be optimistic about the group meeting business going forward. By every industry benchmark and measure, 2017 is shaping up to be a record year, which means more meetings in more locations for more attendees. And though no one in the industry is complaining about this rosy outlook, the strong demand is increasing competition among meeting planners across the board – for the most desirable locations, for the best hotels, for the most creative experiences, for the most talented chefs, and for the best technology available. Because of this robust demand, hotels are in the driver’s seat and they are flexing their collective muscles. Even though over 100,000 new rooms were added last year, hotel rates are expected to rise by a minimum of 4.0%, and they are also charging fees on amenities that were often gratis in the past. In addition, hotels are offering shorter lead times on booking commitments, forcing planners to sign contracts earlier than in past years. Planners are having to work more quickly and to commit farther in advance to secure key properties. Planners are also having to meet increased attendee expectations. They no longer are content with a trade show and a few dinners; they want an experience. Planners need to find ways to create a meaningful experience to ensure that attendees walk away with an impactful memory. This kind of experiential learning can generate a deeper emotional connection, which can ultimately result in increased brand recognition, client retention, and incremental sales. The September Hotel Business Review will examine issues relevant to group business and will report on what some hotels are doing to promote this sector of their operations.